Paul O'Grady's Little Heroes: Episode five

Paul meets brothers Freddie (4) and Arthur (2), who are both being treated at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for unrelated cancers – Arthur was diagnosed with a brain tumour and three months later, Freddie was diagnosed with sarcoma, a soft tissue cancer.

Paul also catches up with George (15), was born with two small holes in his heart and a thickness in his heart muscles. George’s condition is very rare in children, with only a few hundred people in the UK developing the condition in childhood.

Finally, we meet Angel (4), who was just three months old when doctors in Peterborough discovered she had tumours in both her kidneys. When chemotherapy was unsuccessful, she had to have both kidneys removed at GOSH and is now waiting for a transplant.

The patients 

Freddie and Arthur (pictured above)

Freddie and Arthur were diagnosed with cancer just months after each other. Doctors discovered Arthur had a brain tumour and three months later, Freddie was diagnosed with sarcoma, a soft tissue cancer. 

"The boys are like any other brothers," says Natalie, mum to five-year-old Freddie and two-year-old Arthur. "They love each other one minute and the next they are tumbling around fighting over toys and play fighting.

Read their story

Angel

Paul and patient Angel

When Angel was three months old, doctors in Peterborough discovered she had tumours in both her kidneys. Unfortunately, chemotherapy was unsuccessful, so she had to have both kidneys removed at GOSH. She now relies on dialysis to keep her healthy while she waits on the transplant list.

Read Angel's story on the charity site, and learn how the charity supports the hospital

George

Patient George

George has hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a condition where the muscle of the heart becomes abnormally thick – making it more difficult to pump blood around the body. 

Dr Kaski's surgical colleagues operated on his heart, shaving a little bit of the muscle off to allow blood to flow out of the heart more freely. 

Read about George on the charity site

The staff

Professor Darren Hargrave

Professor Darren Hargrave

Professor Hargrave has been looking after children who have brain tumours for over fifteen years. Up until last year, Darren was a NHS consultant – now, as the GOSH Charity Professor of Paediatric Neuro-oncology, he has focused on extensive research into the development of new treatments for brain tumours. One of Darren's patients, Arthur, appears in episode 5.

Read the full interview

Juan Kaski, Consultant Paediatric Cardiologist

Dr Kaski and patient George

Dr Kaski is Director of the GOSH Centre for Inherited Cardiovascular Diseases, and a specialist in treating hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a condition where the muscle of the heart becomes abnormally thick – making it more difficult to pump blood around the body. 

Read about Dr Kaski treating George and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy on the charity site