GOSH statement regarding a former member of staff 12.03.21

12 Mar 2021, 1:45 p.m.

A spokesperson for Great Ormond Street Hospital said:

“First and foremost, our thoughts are with all the victims of this horrendous abuse.

Paul Farrell has admitted to a catalogue of truly awful crimes and we are deeply sorry that he was able to abuse his position and use our hospital to commit some of his offences. His actions are in direct contrast to everything we stand for as a children’s hospital.

We regularly review our safeguarding processes to ensure they are in line with national guidance and strive for best practice.

We will continue to work with the police to understand more about his crimes and consider whether there is anything more we can do to prevent cases like this.

We know that the crimes he committed and his association with the hospital may cause alarm and distress among our patients, their families and our wider hospital community. We would like to reiterate what has been said in court; that Paul Farrell did not target children at GOSH.

We urge anyone who has concerns about this case to call the helpline that we have set up with the NSPCC on 0800 101 996.”

Access our helpline page for more information.

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