News

Find an expert is a list of specialists who can provide expert comment for journalists on a range of health-related issues. 

The press office is responsible for ensuring full written consent is received whenever children are photographed.

See our staff list for details on how to contact the relevant person within the press office at Great Ormond Street Hospital.

News and features

Read our news and features below or visit our 'latest press releases' page for updates from the Great Ormond Street Hospital press office.

Coronavirus (COVID-19): information on shielding for children, young people and families

As we learn more about coronavirus, guidance about who should take extra steps to protect themselves will change. You might receive a text or letter from the Government to let you know that your child needs to start or stop ‘shielding’. We know that this can cause a great deal of anxiety, so we’ve put together some advice from GOSH to clarify what this means for your child and your family. 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) – information for children, young people and families

We understand that you might be worried about coronavirus – also known as COVID-19 – particularly if your child has a long-term health condition.

This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) sets out our advice and the action we are taking to respond to the coronavirus outbreak. You can find guidance for specific patient groups here. Visit gosh.nhs.uk/staysafe to meet Otto the Octopus and find out how you can help reduce the spread of infection, whether you’re out and about or visiting GOSH.

ICH researchers develop a technique to 'print' healthy new tissue

A pioneering international study led by the UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health (ICH) has seen researchers develop a photosensitive bio-gel that uses light treatment to ‘print’ healthy new tissue directly into specific tissues and organs, and sustain blood supply that would allow it to thrive, according to results published in the Nature Biomedical Engineering journal today (22nd June).

Separating conjoined twins Yiḡit and Derman

Brothers Yiḡit and Derman were just 17 months old when they were brought to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH). Born craniopagus, meaning conjoined at the head, their incredibly rare condition required the unique facilities and expertise of GOSH - one of the only sites in the world able to separate and care for craniopagus twins. Hear from just some of the multi-disciplinary team who were involved in their care:

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