Conditions we treat

Want to know more about the conditions we treat at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH)? Just search below:

Recently-identified genetic forms of craniosynostosis

Craniosynostosis is a condition where the plates of bone that make up the skull fuse too early, leading to a misshapen head. There are many different forms of craniosynostosis and this page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of two genetic forms of craniosynostosis (sometime known as Craniosynostosis 3 (CRS3) and Craniosynostosis 4 (CRS4)) that have recently been identified.

Parry-Romburg syndrome

Parry-Romburg syndrome (also known as Progressive Hemifacial Atrophy) is a rare condition affecting the skin and soft tissues on one side of the face (hemifacial). It is considered to be within the group of conditions called morphoea and is named after the two doctors who first described it in the mid-19th century. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Parry-Romburg syndrome.

Pfeiffer syndrome

Pfeiffer syndrome is a type of complex craniosynostosis. There are three different types of Pfeiffer syndrome: Types 1, 2 and 3 (which also known as cloverleaf skull). This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Pfeiffer syndrome. 

Saethre-Chotzen syndrome

Saethre-Chotzen syndrome is a type of complex craniosynostosis named after the two doctors who described it in the mid-20th century. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome.
 

Sagittal craniosynostosis

Sagittal craniosynostosis (also known as scaphocephaly) is the most common type of non-syndromic craniosynostosis and occurs when the sagittal suture fuses before birth. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of sagittal craniosynostosis.

Treacher-Collins syndrome

Treacher-Collins syndrome (also known as mandibulofacial dysostosis) is a congenital (present at birth) condition affecting the bones and tissues in the face. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Treacher-Collins syndrome.

Cleft lip and palate

A cleft lip is a gap in the upper lip and can involve the gum as well. It can affect one side (unilateral) or both sides (bilateral) of the upper lip. It can be a small gap in the lip (incomplete cleft lip) or it can extend into the base of the nose (complete cleft lip).

Cleft lip

A cleft is a hole or gap affecting the tissues in the lip. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of cleft lip and where to get help. 

Cleft palate

A cleft is a hole or gap affecting the tissues in the palate (roof of the mouth). This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the symptoms, causes and treatment of cleft palate and where to get help.

Bronchiolitis

PLEASE NOTE in the light of the current coronavirus (COVID-19) situation, we have created an FAQ with COVID-19 information for children, young people and families at GOSH.

Bronchiolitis is a common chest infection that usually affects babies under a year old. Although many get better without treatment, a small number of children will need hospital treatment, occasionally in the intensive care unit. Here we explain the causes and symptoms of bronchiolitis, the treatment available and where to get help.