Conditions we treat

Want to know more about the conditions we treat at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH)? Just search below:

Neuronal migration disorder

Neuronal migration disorder is an umbrella term given to several conditions including lissencephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum and microgyria. They all arise while the baby is developing in the womb.This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of neuronal migration disorders and where to get help.

Periventricular leukomalacia

Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) is a type of brain injury that is most common in babies born too soon (premature) or at low birthweight. The white matter (leuko) surrounding the ventricles of the brain (periventricular) is deprived of blood and oxygen leading to softening (malacia). The white matter is responsible for transmitting messages from nerve cells in the brain so damage to the white matter can cause problems with movement and other body functions.

Meckel's diverticulum

Meckel’s diverticulum is one of the most common congenital digestive system disorders – congenital means that the disorder was present at birth. When a child’s small intestine was developing, a small pouch formed consisting of tissue from elsewhere in the body. Usually the pouch – also known as Meckel’s diverticulum – is formed from tissue similar to that found in the pancreas or stomach.

Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon

Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon (KMP) refers to clotting problems arising as a result of the rare benign (non-cancerous) vascular lesions known as kaposiform haemangioendothelioma (KHE) and tufted angioma.Infantile haemangiomas never lead to KMP. This information sheet provides information about Kasabach-Merritt syndrome, what causes it and how it can be treated. It also explains what to expect when a child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for diagnosis and treatment.

Radial club hand

Radial club hand is a congenital (present at birth) hand anomaly where the radius bone in the arm is missing or underdeveloped, causing the hand to be bent towards the body (radially deviated). It is also known as radial ray deficiency or anomaly. One in 75,000 children is born with radial club hand.This page explains about radial club hand, what causes it, how common it is, what functional problems your child might have and how it can be treated.
It also explains what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for assessment and treatment.