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Plastics physiotherapy

The plastics physiotherapist at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) sees children with a wide range of problems. Some of these problems are present at birth (congenital) and some may have developed in childhood. Children who need plastic or reconstructive surgery are seen as outpatients, day case patients or inpatients. Children and young people need to be referred to physiotherapy by the plastics medical team before they are reviewed.

Lung transplant

This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) is for parents of children and young people undergoing assessment for possible lung or heart-lung transplantation. A transplant is a serious operation and is not without risk. A transplant can be the only effective treatment option for certain serious lung diseases; however, it is not a cure. In many situations transplantation can lead to an extension of life with improved quality.

Neurodisability services

The Occupational Therapy team provide input into the Neurodisability clinics at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), working collaboratively as part of the multidisciplinary team. The occupational therapist will discuss your child’s current functional skills and assess their ability to carry out age appropriate self-care and school based tasks. Following the assessment, advice to support your child’s occupational performance is offered to local services to ensure continuity of care.

How retinal laser treatment saved Lucas's eye

Two-year-old Lucas, who features on Paul O'Grady's Little Heroes, travelled from Belfast in Northern Ireland with his mum Caitlin and dad Johnny, arriving at GOSH for specialised retinal laser surgery on a detached retina, caused by a rare eye condition called Coats’ Disease. Here his mum Caitlin shares their story. 

Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)

This booklet has been produced jointly between PID UK, Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) and the Great North Children’s Hospital. The information has been reviewed by the PID UK Medical Advisory Panel and Patient Representative Panel and by families affected by PID. It is designed to help answer the questions families may have about the immune condition called severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) but should not replace advice from a clinical immunologist.

Landau Kleffner syndrome

Landau Kleffner syndrome (LKS) is a rare epilepsy. It occurs in children usually between the ages of three and nine years and is characterised by loss of language skills and silent electrical seizures during sleep. It may be associated with convulsive seizures and additional difficulties with behaviour, social interaction, motor skills and learning. It is not usually life-threatening, but can impact greatly on quality of life unless it responds well to treatment. It occurs in approximately one child in a million. The disease is more common in boys and does not usually run in families.

Corticosteroids to treat immune-mediated neurological conditions

Corticosteroids are hormonal substances that are produced naturally in the body by the adrenal glands (which are just above each kidney) and by the reproductive organs. There are many different types of corticosteroids and they have different effects on the body. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the use of corticosteroids to treat immune-mediated neurological conditions, how they are given and some of the possible side effects. Each person reacts differently to medicines, so your child will not necessarily suffer from the side effects mentioned. If you have any questions or concerns, please speak to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

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