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Tuberculosis (TB): care of the child and protection of staff and patients

This guideline describes the procedure which must be followed whenever a diagnosis of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis (M.TB) infection is suspected or confirmed, to optimally protect staff, patients and other visitors from risk of infection and assist in the care of the child with M.TB (not including Occupational Health policy).

NOTE: We review our guidelines regularly and this guideline is now past its review date. The content of the guideline below may not reflect the most recent evidence based practice. Please use with caution.

Aspirin

Aspirin is a medicine commonly used to relieve pain, reduce swelling and reduce a
high temperature. It also makes the blood less sticky so it is less likely to form a clot. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital describes aspirin, how it is given and some of its possible side effects.

Ketogenic diet

The ketogenic diet (KD) is a therapeutic diet, which has been shown to improve seizure control in patients with drug resistant epilepsy, and is used in some patients with metabolic conditions for example, glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1) and pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency (PDH).

NOTE: We review our guidelines regularly and this guideline is now past its review date. The content of the guideline below may not reflect the most recent evidence based practice. Please use with caution.

Furosemide

Furosemide belongs to a group of drugs called diuretics which increase the amount of urine produced. Furosemide is a medicine used in patients with heart and kidney problems to stop fluid building up in the body and so reduce the workload on the heart.

Epidermolysis bullosa simplex: generalised severe type 

Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is the term used to describe a number of rare genetic conditions which cause the skin to blister and shear in response to minimal friction and trauma. There are four broad categories of EB: EB simplex, junctional EB, dystrophic EB and Kindler syndrome. Within each of these categories there are several subtypes. One of the subtypes of EB simplex is the generalised severe type (previously known as Dowling Meara type).

Landau Kleffner syndrome

Landau Kleffner syndrome (LKS) is a rare epilepsy. It occurs in children usually between the ages of three and nine years and is characterised by loss of language skills and silent electrical seizures during sleep. It may be associated with convulsive seizures and additional difficulties with behaviour, social interaction, motor skills and learning. It is not usually life-threatening, but can impact greatly on quality of life unless it responds well to treatment. It occurs in approximately one child in a million. The disease is more common in boys and does not usually run in families.

Landau Kleffner Syndrome: language and communication

Children with Landau Kleffner Syndrome (LKS) experience a significant regression in their understanding and use of spoken language. This loss of skills often occurs at the onset of the disease and can be the first sign for families that something is wrong. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes how Landau Kleffner Syndrome (LKS) can affect a child’s language skills and outlines recommendations for input and support.

MRSA

MRSA is short for Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureusS. aureus is a bacterium (bug or germ) that about 30 per cent of us carry on our skin or in our nose without knowing about it. This is called 'colonisation'. This page explains about MRSA, how it is passed on and how it can be treated.It also explains about things we are doing at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) to reduce the chance of it spreading.