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Gastrostomy management

A gastrostomy is a feeding tube that is inserted directly into the stomach either surgically under direct vision (open or laproscopic), endoscopically (with a camera), or radiologically (x-ray guidance). A gastrostomy tube allows the delivery of supplemental nutrition and medications directly into the stomach. It also provides a mechanism to drain gastric contents if required. In order for gastrostomy feeding to be successful the child or young person must have a functioning gastrointestinal tract.

Corticosteroids to treat immune-mediated neurological conditions

Corticosteroids are hormonal substances that are produced naturally in the body by the adrenal glands (which are just above each kidney) and by the reproductive organs. There are many different types of corticosteroids and they have different effects on the body. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the use of corticosteroids to treat immune-mediated neurological conditions, how they are given and some of the possible side effects. Each person reacts differently to medicines, so your child will not necessarily suffer from the side effects mentioned. If you have any questions or concerns, please speak to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Invasive monitoring (IM) and Stereo-electroencephalography (SEEG) for epilepsy surgery: nursing management

This guideline is intended to guide and facilitate the care of patients under the care of the clinical teams at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust (GOSH). The guidance contained herein is not intended to replace individual assessment and personalised treatment of the patient.