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Cytotoxic and cytostatic medication - safe handling and administration

The term cytotoxic drug is used to refer to all drugs with direct anti-tumour activity including anti-cancer drugs, monoclonal antibodies, partially targeted treatments and immunosuppressive drugs. 

NOTE: We review our guidelines regularly and this guideline is now past its review date. The content of the guideline below may not reflect the most recent evidence based practice. Please use with caution.

Generalised lymphatic anomaly (GLA)

Generalised lymphatic anomaly (GLA) – previously known as lymphangiomatosis – is the name given to a rare, congenital (present at birth), and progressive disorder of lymphatic channels which can affect different organs including the bones and the intestines. It can cause problems if the abnormal lymphatic tissue develops within important tissues and structures. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of generalised lymphatic anomalies (GLA) and where to get help. 

Apert syndrome

Apert syndrome is a type of complex craniosynostosis named after the doctor who first described it in the early 20th century. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Apert syndrome and where to get help.

Oesophageal atresia with tracheo-oesophageal fistula

Oesophageal atresia (OA) is a rare condition where a short section at the top of the oesophagus (gullet or foodpipe) has not formed properly so is not connected to the stomach. This means food cannot pass from the throat to the stomach. Tracheo-oesophageal fistula (TOF) is another rare condition, which tends to occur alongside oesophageal atresia. This is where part of the oesophagus is joined to the trachea (windpipe). This page explains about oesophageal atresia and tracheooesophageal fistula, how they are treated and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for treatment.

Kelly procedure

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the Kelly procedure used to strengthen the sphincter at the bladder neck and what to expect when your child is admitted to GOSH for the operation.