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Neuropathic pain medicines

This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about medicines used to treat children and young people with neuropathic pain  – pain caused by the nerves sending wrong signals to and from the brain. At GOSH, we mainly use amitriptyline, gabapentin and pregabalin, although other medicines are available.

It is important that you should also read the information provided by the pain relief manufacturer, however our information relates specifically to children and young people and so may differ.

Corticosteroids to treat immune-mediated neurological conditions

Corticosteroids are hormonal substances that are produced naturally in the body by the adrenal glands (which are just above each kidney) and by the reproductive organs. There are many different types of corticosteroids and they have different effects on the body. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the use of corticosteroids to treat immune-mediated neurological conditions, how they are given and some of the possible side effects. Each person reacts differently to medicines, so your child will not necessarily suffer from the side effects mentioned. If you have any questions or concerns, please speak to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Amiloride

Amiloride belongs to a group of medicines known as diuretics which increase the amount of urine produced. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes how this medicine is given and some of its possible side effects.

Genetic aspects of primary immunodeficiency

This booklet has been produced jointly between PID UK, Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) and the Great North Children’s Hospital. It is designed to help answer the questions that families may have about the genetic aspects of primary immunodeficiencies (PID). The information has been reviewed by the PID UK Medical Advisory Panel and Patient Representative Panel and by families affected by PID but should not replace advice from a clinical immunologist or a geneticist.

Intravenous infusion of dihydroergotamine for headaches and migraines

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about your admission for a course of infusions of a medicine called dihydroergotamine (or DHE for short) given into a vein. You might have already tried various other medicines to improve your headaches and migraines. This is the next step in treatment. As well as explaining what will happen during the admission, this page tells you about the medicine itself and any side effects that may happen.

Multiple sclerosis and fatigue

Fatigue is an overwhelming sense of tiredness and exhaustion, and is a very common symptom in MS, with most people with MS experiencing fatigue in some way at some time. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about
the fatigue that is a common feature of multiple sclerosis (MS). As well as describing what we know about fatigue, it also gives some suggestions to manage it.

Bone SPECT/CT scans

This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about bone scans, how it is used to look at your child’s bones, what is involved and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for the scan.

Your child is having an echocardiogram under sedation

Echocardiograms (Echo) are one of the most frequently used scans for diagnosing heart problems. An Echo is an ultrasound scan of the heart. As your child will need to lie very still for the scan, we may suggest that they have sedation to help. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about echocardiograms, what is involved and what to expect when your child has the scan.

Landau Kleffner Syndrome: language and communication

Children with Landau Kleffner Syndrome (LKS) experience a significant regression in their understanding and use of spoken language. This loss of skills often occurs at the onset of the disease and can be the first sign for families that something is wrong. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes how Landau Kleffner Syndrome (LKS) can affect a child’s language skills and outlines recommendations for input and support.