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Special handling requirements for oral cytotoxics and immunosuppressant medicines

This information sheet describes how oral cytotoxic and immunosuppressant medicines should be given and provides advice on how to handle these medicines safely. It does not give specific information relating to individual medicines or describe their uses. For this information you must read the individual leaflets produced for the medicine that your child is taking.

Tioguanine

Tioguanine is a medicine used to treat certain types of cancer and leukaemia.This page explains what tioguanine is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. Each person reacts differently to medicines, so your child will not necessarily suffer from every side effect mentioned. 

Oral sirolimus to treat vascular problems

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) provides information about sirolimus (also known as rapamycin) oral solution and tablets, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. Each person reacts differently to medicines, so your child will not necessarily suffer every side effect mentioned. This information sheet describes how sirolimus is used to treat vascular problems – for use in other specialties, please see our other information sheets. If you have any questions or concerns, please ask your doctor, nurse or pharmacist or telephone one of the contact numbers on the information sheet.

Antroduodenal manometry

Manometry is a way of measuring how well the muscles and nerves in the digestive system are working. Antroduodenal manometry looks at the muscles and nerves in the stomach and small intestine. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the antroduodenal manometry test and what to expect when your child has one.

Emergency steroid management plan for patients on long term, high dose glucocorticoid treatment

Many patients in the trust are treated with high dose steroids to manage their condition. When these medications have been used on a long term basis the child or young person can develop adrenal suppression. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about adrenal suppression and what action needs to be taken if adrenal suppression occurs. 

Neuropathic pain medicines

This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about medicines used to treat children and young people with neuropathic pain  – pain caused by the nerves sending wrong signals to and from the brain. At GOSH, we mainly use amitriptyline, gabapentin and pregabalin, although other medicines are available.

It is important that you should also read the information provided by the pain relief manufacturer, however our information relates specifically to children and young people and so may differ.

Corticosteroids to treat immune-mediated neurological conditions

Corticosteroids are hormonal substances that are produced naturally in the body by the adrenal glands (which are just above each kidney) and by the reproductive organs. There are many different types of corticosteroids and they have different effects on the body. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the use of corticosteroids to treat immune-mediated neurological conditions, how they are given and some of the possible side effects. Each person reacts differently to medicines, so your child will not necessarily suffer from the side effects mentioned. If you have any questions or concerns, please speak to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Amiloride

Amiloride belongs to a group of medicines known as diuretics which increase the amount of urine produced. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes how this medicine is given and some of its possible side effects.

Etoposide

Etoposide is a drug used to treat certain types of cancer and leukaemia. This page explains what etoposide is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. Each person reacts differently to medicines, so your child will not necessarily suffer from every side effect mentioned. If you have any questions or concerns, please speak to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Etoposide

Etoposide is a drug used to treat certain types of cancer and leukaemia. This page explains what etoposide is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. Each person reacts differently to medicines, so your child will not necessarily suffer from every side effect mentioned. If you have any questions or concerns, please speak to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Genetic aspects of primary immunodeficiency

This booklet has been produced jointly between PID UK, Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) and the Great North Children’s Hospital. It is designed to help answer the questions that families may have about the genetic aspects of primary immunodeficiencies (PID). The information has been reviewed by the PID UK Medical Advisory Panel and Patient Representative Panel and by families affected by PID but should not replace advice from a clinical immunologist or a geneticist.

Coming to hospital soon after birth

This page has been written to explain about coming to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) soon after your baby’s birth and what support you can expect when you stay here. Whether the transfer was planned or not, you are bound to feel overwhelmed by all that you are feeling. We hope that this information sheet gives you some useful tips and suggestions.

Intravenous infusion of dihydroergotamine for headaches and migraines

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about your admission for a course of infusions of a medicine called dihydroergotamine (or DHE for short) given into a vein. You might have already tried various other medicines to improve your headaches and migraines. This is the next step in treatment. As well as explaining what will happen during the admission, this page tells you about the medicine itself and any side effects that may happen.

Bone SPECT/CT scans

This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about bone scans, how it is used to look at your child’s bones, what is involved and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for the scan.