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Adjusting to life as lockdown eases: information for families

This year, 2020, will certainly be remembered as one of the strangest years any of us will experience in our lifetimes. Dealing with worry about coronavirus (COVID-19), concerns for family and friends, issues with money and work, as well as the practicalities of several months staying at home, has been hard for lots of us.

However, when lockdown is easing and we can start to leave our homes again, go back to school and work, start meeting family and friends albeit at a distance, our worries can change and we may feel just as nervous as before.  It can be difficult to cope with the ‘outside world’ and various rules about what we can do and where, as well as not knowing when rules might change again. This can be particularly hard for children and young people so the Patient Experience team has compiled this information to help everyone adjust to the ‘new normal’.

Reducing exposure to cryptosporidial infection: information for families with an immune-compromised child

This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) is for families with a child who is thought to be at particular risk from cryptosporidial infection. We hope that it will help you to understand something about the infection and advise on ways in which you can minimise the risk of acquiring the infection. The advice in this information is not applicable to children, young people and adults with a normal immune system.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) – information for children, young people and families

We understand that you might be worried about coronavirus – also known as COVID-19 – particularly if your child has a long-term health condition.

This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) sets out our advice and the action we are taking to respond to the coronavirus outbreak. You can find guidance for specific patient groups here. Visit gosh.nhs.uk/staysafe to meet Otto the Octopus and find out how you can help reduce the spread of infection, whether you’re out and about or visiting GOSH.

Dasatinib

Dasatinib is used to treat various types of leukaemia (cancer of the white blood cells). Dasatinib is a ‘biologic’ medicine, that is, it is a manmade version of a naturally occurring molecule. It works by stopping the process that makes cancer cells grow and divide.This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what dasatinib is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. 

Coronavirus (COVID-19): information on shielding for children, young people and families

As we learn more about coronavirus, guidance about who should take extra steps to protect themselves will change. You might receive a text or letter from the Government to let you know that your child needs to start or stop ‘shielding’. We know that this can cause a great deal of anxiety, so we’ve put together some advice from GOSH to clarify what this means for your child and your family. 

Facial bipartition with or without using a rigid external distraction (RED) frame

Facial bipartition is an operation to reshape the front portion of the skull, face and upper jaw to correct an abnormal head shape. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the operation called facial bipartition with or without rigid external distraction (RED) frame, which is used to treat craniofacial disorders. It explains how to prepare your child for surgery as well as what to expect in hospital afterwards. 

Teenagers

It is normal for anyone (at any age) to feel apprehensive about coming into hospital. Teenagers already face the everyday challenges of growing older, balancing increasing amounts of schoolwork and enjoying downtime with their friends. Being unwell, needing treatment or spending any amount of time in hospital can be disruptive for young people and their families in addition to these usual demands.

Saethre-Chotzen syndrome

Saethre-Chotzen syndrome is a type of complex craniosynostosis named after the two doctors who described it in the mid-20th century. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome.
 

Admission to GOSH during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic

We understand that you might be worried about coronavirus – also known as COVID-19. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what to expect when your child is admitted to GOSH for a procedure, test or operation. Please read this alongside our general FAQs for families at gosh.nhs.uk/covid-19-FAQ. You can also find the latest news, information and resources in our COVID-19 information hub at gosh.nhs.uk/coronavirus-hub.

Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a relatively common skin condition affecting around two per cent of the UK population. It causes thickened flat plaques or patches of skin that are red, crusty, itchy and flaky.This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of psoriasis and where to get help.

Research at GOSH

Research can improve children’s lives, offering new ways of treating diseases or developing new medicines. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the research we do and how to find out more.

DMSA scan

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the DMSA scan used to look at your child’s kidneys, what is involved and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for the scan.

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