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Why we do research

Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH)’s mission is to provide world-class clinical care and training for the benefit of children in the UK and worldwide. This means that it is also our mission to pioneer new research and treatments for the children that we see at GOSH, particularly the very sick...

Immunoglobulin therapy

This booklet has been produced by the PID UK Medical Advisory Panel and Patient Representative Panel in conjunction with Great Ormond Street Hospital and the Great North Children’s Hospital. It provides information on immunoglobulin therapy (Ig therapy) to help answer the questions parents may have about this form of treatment for children and young people affected by primary immunodeficiency (PID).The information should not, however, replace advice from a clinical immunologist.

NIHR GOSH BRC Clinical Training (PhD) Fellowship

CLOSED: This scheme funds patient-focused early phase translational clinical research (commonly referred to as experimental medicine), the aim of which is to pull basic scientific discoveries into clinical research, and through to benefits for patients and the NHS. This can include development of new pharmaceuticals, devices, preventative measures and diagnostic tests.

Internal GOSH/ICH and external applicants. 

How to get referred

Lots of people contact the hospital asking for how to be referred to see our doctors. This page explains the process you need to follow. We cannot accept referrals from anyone who is not a doctor and as we do not have an Accident and Emergency Department at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH). You should not come here unless you have an appointment or an admission.

Gastrostomy management

A gastrostomy is a feeding tube that is inserted directly into the stomach either surgically under direct vision (open or laproscopic), endoscopically (with a camera), or radiologically (x-ray guidance). A gastrostomy tube allows the delivery of supplemental nutrition and medications directly into the stomach. It also provides a mechanism to drain gastric contents if required. In order for gastrostomy feeding to be successful the child or young person must have a functioning gastrointestinal tract.

Bowel incontinence

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains why bowel incontinence (encopresis or soiling) can occur in toilet-trained children and young people. It also gives suggestions for treatment and strategies to try at home to improve the situation.