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Ciclosporin after Bone Marrow Transplant

Ciclosporin is a medicine that is used to treat many different conditions. It belongs to a group of medicines known as immunosuppressive agents. These medicines are used to lower the body’s immune response to prevent rejection of organs such as kidneys after a transplant. It is also used both before and after bone marrow transplants.This page explains what ciclosporin is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. Each person reacts differently to medicines, so your child will not necessarily suffer from every side effect mentioned. If you have any questions or concerns, please speak to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

MEG scans

The brain works by a series of nerve impulses, which cause electrical signals within the brain. These signals (also called brainwaves) can be recorded through the scalp using an electroencephalogram (EEG). The electrical signals also produce weak magnetic fields, which can be measured through the skull and scalp using a magnetoencephalogram (MEG) scan.

Splenectomy

A splenectomy is an operation to remove the spleen. If you have a rare blood disease, such as hereditary spherocytosis, you may need to have your spleen removed. At Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) we do splenectomies using keyhole surgery, which is a minimally invasive form of surgery.

Blinatumomab

Blinatumomab is used to treat various types of leukaemia (cancer of the white blood cells). Blinatumomab is a ‘biologic’ medicine, that is, it is a manmade version of a naturally occurring antibody. It works by stopping the particular type of leukaemia cells from growing. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what blinatumomab is, how it is given and some of the possible side 

How to get referred

Lots of people contact the hospital asking for how to be referred to see our doctors. This page explains the process you need to follow. We cannot accept referrals from anyone who is not a doctor and as we do not have an Accident and Emergency Department at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH). You should not come here unless you have an appointment or an admission.