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What to expect from a non-medical prescriber

Since May 2006, some nurses and pharmacists have been allowed to prescribe medicines that were previously only allowed to be prescribed by doctors. Non-medical prescribing has been introduced to improve patients’ access to treatment – that is, making it easier for you to get the medicines you need for your child. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the process. 

MRSA

MRSA is short for Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. S. aureus is a bacterium (bug or germ) that about 30 per cent of us carry on our skin or in our nose without knowing about it. This is called 'colonisation'. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about MRSA, how it is passed on and how it can be treated.

Your child is having an echocardiogram under sedation

Echocardiograms (Echo) are one of the most frequently used scans for diagnosing heart problems. An Echo is an ultrasound scan of the heart. As your child will need to lie very still for the scan, we may suggest that they have sedation to help. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about echocardiograms, what is involved and what to expect when your child has the scan.

Irinotecan

Irinotecan is a chemotherapy medicine used for the treatment of certain types of cancer. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what irinotecan is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. 

Bevacizumab

Bevacizumab is used to treat various types of cancer and leukaemia. It is a ‘biologic’ medicine, that is, it is a manmade antibody that targets a specific protein on the surface of the cells that inhibits the formulation of blood vessels in tumours. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what bevacizumab is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. 

Temozolomide

Temozolomide is a chemotherapy drug used to treat certain types of cancer. This page explains what temozolomide is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. Each person reacts differently to medicines, so your child will not necessarily suffer from every side effect mentioned. 

Dabrafenib

Dabrafenib is used to treat various types of cancer. It is a ‘biologic’ medicine, that is, it works by stopping the process that makes cancer cells grow and divide. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what dabrafenib is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. 

Trametinib

Trametinib is used to treat various types of cancer. It is a ‘biologic’ medicine, that is, it works by stopping the process that makes cancer cells grow and divide.This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what trametinib is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects.