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Splenectomy

A splenectomy is an operation to remove the spleen. It can be carried out using keyhole surgery or traditional open surgery. Most splenectomies at GOSH are carried out using keyhole surgery.

Imatinib

Imatinib is a chemotherapy medicine used to treat certain types of cancer. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what imatinib is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. 

Special handling requirements for oral cytotoxics and immunosuppressant medicines

This information sheet describes how oral cytotoxic and immunosuppressant medicines should be given and provides advice on how to handle these medicines safely. It does not give specific information relating to individual medicines or describe their uses. For this information you must read the individual leaflets produced for the medicine that your child is taking.

What to expect from a non-medical prescriber

Since May 2006, some nurses and pharmacists have been allowed to prescribe medicines that were previously only allowed to be prescribed by doctors. Non-medical prescribing has been introduced to improve patients’ access to treatment – that is, making it easier for you to get the medicines you need for your child. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the process. 

Helping young children cope with hospital

Hospitals can be strange places for young children. On a visit to hospital, they will encounter lots of different people in an unfamiliar environment. There will be many new things to see, hear and smell and there may be lots of waiting. Along with the general disruption this brings to the normal routine, all these things can make hospital visits stressful or overwhelming for young children and their families.

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) aims to give you some reassurance and a few ideas for how you could approach them. All these suggestions come from our play team, who between them have many years of experience working with children, young people and families in hospital. If you have any particular tips or methods that have worked for you, please contact us to tell us about them.

Micturating cystourethrogram (MCUG)

A micturating cystourethrogram (MCUG) is a scan that shows how well your child’s bladder works. It is used to diagnose why your child may have urinary tract infections. It is also used to show up any abnormalities with your child’s urinary system. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the micturating cystourethrogram scan, what is involved and what to expect when your child has one.

Coming to hospital soon after birth

This page has been written to explain about coming to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) soon after your baby’s birth and what support you can expect when you stay here. Whether the transfer was planned or not, you are bound to feel overwhelmed by all that you are feeling. We hope that this information sheet gives you some useful tips and suggestions.

Irinotecan

Irinotecan is a chemotherapy medicine used for the treatment of certain types of cancer. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what irinotecan is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. 

Your child is having an MRI scan under intravenous sedation

MRI is short for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. This means that rather than using x-rays, the scan uses a strong magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to take very detailed pictures of inside the body. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about having a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan under intravenous sedation, how to prepare for it and what care your child will need afterwards.

Your child is having an MRI scan under intravenous sedation

MRI is short for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). This means that rather than using x-rays, the scan uses a strong magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to take very detailed pictures of inside the body. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about having a magnetic resonance imaging scan under intravenous sedation, how to prepare for it and what care your child will need afterwards.

Three-Minute Step test

Children and young people may be referred for a test called the 3-Minute Step test (3MST). The test is a type of exercise test and can be used to assess your child’s exercise tolerance. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes what to expect when your child is booked for a 3MST test.

Six Minute Walk test

Children and young people may be referred for a test called the 6 Minute Walk test (6MWT). The test is a type of exercise test and can be used to assess your child’s exercise tolerance. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes what to expect when your child is booked for a 6MWT test. 

Temozolomide

Temozolomide is a chemotherapy drug used to treat certain types of cancer. This page explains what temozolomide is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. Each person reacts differently to medicines, so your child will not necessarily suffer from every side effect mentioned. 

Bevacizumab

Bevacizumab is used to treat various types of cancer and leukaemia. It is a ‘biologic’ medicine, that is, it is a manmade antibody that targets a specific protein on the surface of the cells that inhibits the formulation of blood vessels in tumours. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what bevacizumab is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. 

Flutter®

If you find it difficult to clear sputum (phlegm) from your lungs, you might use a Flutter® as part of your treatment at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH).