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Having a RED Frame

The RED frame, which stands for ‘Rigid External Distraction’, has been used successfully for many years in children and adults to help correct many facial problems by advancing the forehead and midface. The frame helps the Craniofacial team to make adjustments to the shape of the face. This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains more about how we use RED frames.

Venous sclerotherapy

Venous sclerotherapy is a procedure used to treat venous malformations. Venous malformations are made up of extra veins that have no use and cause problems. This page explains about venous sclerotherapy, why it might be suggested and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for the procedure. 

Imatinib

Imatinib is a chemotherapy medicine used to treat certain types of cancer. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what imatinib is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. 

What to expect from a non-medical prescriber

Since May 2006, some nurses and pharmacists have been allowed to prescribe medicines that were previously only allowed to be prescribed by doctors. Non-medical prescribing has been introduced to improve patients’ access to treatment – that is, making it easier for you to get the medicines you need for your child. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the process. 

Temozolomide

Temozolomide is a chemotherapy drug used to treat certain types of cancer. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what temozolomide is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects.

Splenectomy

A splenectomy is an operation to remove the spleen. It can be carried out using keyhole surgery or traditional open surgery. Most splenectomies at GOSH are carried out using keyhole surgery.

Coming to hospital soon after birth

This page has been written to explain about coming to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) soon after your baby’s birth and what support you can expect when you stay here. Whether the transfer was planned or not, you are bound to feel overwhelmed by all that you are feeling. We hope that this information sheet gives you some useful tips and suggestions.

Bevacizumab

Bevacizumab is used to treat various types of cancer and leukaemia. It is a ‘biologic’ medicine, that is, it is a manmade antibody that targets a specific protein on the surface of the cells that inhibits the formulation of blood vessels in tumours. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what bevacizumab is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. 

Your child is having an MRI scan under intravenous sedation

MRI is short for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. This means that rather than using x-rays, the scan uses a strong magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to take very detailed pictures of inside the body. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about having a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan under intravenous sedation, how to prepare for it and what care your child will need afterwards.