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Lung transplant

This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) is for parents of children and young people undergoing assessment for possible lung or heart-lung transplantation. A transplant is a serious operation and is not without risk. A transplant can be the only effective treatment option for certain serious lung diseases; however, it is not a cure. In many situations transplantation can lead to an extension of life with improved quality.

Helping your teenager through transition from GOSH to adult neuromuscular services

Transition is a planned process. It aims to:
  • support teenagers in the development of skills to become more independent in their healthcare
  • support parents in helping their teenager to achieve this to the best of their ability and
  • prepare for transfer from child-centred healthcare to adult healthcare services. 
This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) offers you some suggestions about how you might help your teenager to move through transition.

Hepatitis B

‘Hepatitis’ means inflammation of the liver – this inflammation can occur for many reasons, one of which is viral infection. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of hepatitis B in children and where to get help.

Juvenile Dermatomyositis (JDM)

Juvenile Dermatomyositis (JDM) is an autoimmune condition which means that the immune system which normally protects the body reacts abnormally and becomes overactive in normal tissues. This immune system reaction leads to inflammation (pain/redness/swelling) which can lead to possible tissue damage. In dermatomyositis, the inflammation affects mainly the small blood vessels in muscle (myositis) and skin (dermatitis). This inflammation may cause muscle weakness or pain and skin rashes particularly on the face, eyelids, knuckles, knees and elbows.

Bone marrow test

If you come to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for a bone marrow test (or biopsy) your doctors will take a sample of your bone marrow that they can then look at closely under a microscope. 

Generalised lymphatic anomaly (GLA)

Generalised lymphatic anomaly (GLA) – previously known as lymphangiomatosis – is the name given to a rare, congenital (present at birth), and progressive disorder of lymphatic channels which can affect different organs including the bones and the intestines. It can cause problems if the abnormal lymphatic tissue develops within important tissues and structures. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of generalised lymphatic anomalies (GLA) and where to get help.