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Admission to GOSH during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic

We understand that you might be worried about coronavirus – also known as COVID-19. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what to expect when your child is admitted to GOSH for a procedure, test or operation. Please read this alongside our general FAQs for families at gosh.nhs.uk/covid-19-FAQ. You can also find the latest news, information and resources in our COVID-19 information hub at gosh.nhs.uk/coronavirus-hub.

Preparing for treatment

Hospitals can be scary places, especially if your child is coming in for an operation. To help reassure you and let you know what to expect, take a look at our video podcast from teen Ryan, who has come to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for an operation on his leg.

Central venous access devices for children with lysosomal storage disorders

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about central venous access devices, particularly for children with lysosomal storage disorders. Some lysosomal storage disorders can be treated with enzyme replacement therapy. This needs to be given directly into the blood stream. To do this, we will put a central venous access device into one of your child’s veins. This gives easy access to your child’s bloodstream so that your child can have enzyme replacement therapy.

Video capsule endoscopy 

A video capsule endoscopy is a test to look at the inside small intestine (also known as the small bowel) for to identify and diagnose any abnormalities. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the Video Capsule Endoscopy (VCE) procedure, what it involves and what to expect when your child comes to GOSH for the test.

Obsessive compulsive disorder

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is an anxiety disorder characterised by intrusive, distressing, unwanted thoughts (obsessions) and time-consuming, senseless rituals (compulsions). OCD occurs in about one per cent of the population and is therefore fairly common, which means it is helpful for school staff to know about it.

Unleashing the power of the genome to help children with rare diseases

With 80% of rare diseases having a genetic component, understanding a person’s genome – their unique sequence of DNA and complete genetic code  – has a huge part to play in both diagnosis and care for patients and their families. Dr Daniel Gale, Rare Disease Lead for the North Thames Genomics Laboratory Hub, which is led by Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), provides an update on where genomics is now in relation to rare disease, and the exciting developments ahead in this field.

Spinal surgery at GOSH

At Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), we have developed a pathway for children and young people having spinal surgery. Spinal surgery is a complex procedure, so we want you to understand the benefits and risks of the operation so you can make an informed decision about whether to go ahead. This page explains what will happen from your child’s initial clinic appointment through to discharge, which clinicians you may meet and what to expect.