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Haemophilia A

Haemophilia A (also known as Classic Haemophilia or Factor VIII deficiency) is the most well-known type of clotting disorder. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Haemophilia A and where to get help. 

Haemophilia B

Haemophilia B (also known as Factor IX deficiency) is a type of clotting disorder, much rarer than Haemophilia A (Classic Haemophilia or Factor VIII deficiency). A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Haemophilia B and where to get help.

Prothrombin (factor II) deficiency

Prothrombin (factor II) deficiency is a type of clotting disorder. A specific protein called prothrombin is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of inherited prothrombin deficiency and where to get help.

Fibrinogen (factor I) deficiency

Fibrinogen (factor I) deficiency is a type of clotting disorder. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of fibrinogen deficiency and where to get help.

Reducing exposure to cryptosporidial infection: information for families with an immune-compromised child

This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) is for families with a child who is thought to be at particular risk from cryptosporidial infection. We hope that it will help you to understand something about the infection and advise on ways in which you can minimise the risk of acquiring the infection. The advice in this information is not applicable to children, young people and adults with a normal immune system.

Treating and reducing the risk of pressure ulcers after leaving hospital

Our skin is the most important barrier against infection so we need to look after it carefully. Sometimes, for a variety of reasons, people who are unwell develop pressure ulcers. At Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), we recognise that children can develop pressure ulcers too. This information sheet explains about the steps you can continue to take at home to reduce the risk of your child developing a pressure ulcer. It also explains how to manage a pre-existing pressure ulcer at home.

Research and publications from the Psychological Medicine Service and National Tourette Syndrome Clinic

We have an ongoing programme of research, and you or your child may be invited to take part in a research project whilst under the care of the team. This is always entirely voluntary, and whether you choose to participate or not, your clinical care will not be affected. Any information gathered may be used anonymously for research purposes to improve our understanding and lead to better treatments for other children and families in the future.

Chest drains

A chest drain is a plastic tube inserted into the chest to drain off fluid or air that might be collecting there after an operation or accident or as a result of disease. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about chest drains and what to expect when your child has one.

Cleft lip repair

Cleft lip repair is an operation to reconstruct the shape of the lip and nose. If there is a cleft palate as well, then the front half (anterior) of the palate is also repaired. This information sheet explains about the operation to repair a cleft lip and what to expect when your child comes to the North Thames Cleft Service for the operation.