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Electrogastrogram

An electrogastrogram (EGG) is a painless test which measures the electrical activity in the stomach, before, during and after food. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the EGG test, what it involves and what to expect when your child has the test.

Choanal atresia

Choanal atresia is a rare condition that is present from birth, in which the nasal passages are blocked by bone or tissue. This condition can affect one or both nasal passages. This page explains about choanal atresia and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for treatment.

Coronavirus (COVID-19): information on shielding for children, young people and families

As we learn more about coronavirus, guidance about who should take extra steps to protect themselves will change. You might receive a text or letter from the Government to let you know that your child needs to start or stop ‘shielding’. We know that this can cause a great deal of anxiety, so we’ve put together some advice from GOSH to clarify what this means for your child and your family. 

Cortisol deficiency

Find out more about cortisol deficiency and how it is treated. This page also contains information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) about how to deal with illnesses, accidents and other stressful events in children on cortisol replacement.

Anorectal anomaly

An anorectal anomaly is a disorder affecting the anus and the rectum, the last part of the digestive system.This page explains about anorectal anomaly, how it can be treated and what to expect when a child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH).

Haemangiomas

A haemangioma is a collection of small blood vessels that form a lump under the skin. They’re sometimes called ‘strawberry marks’ because the surface of a haemangioma can look like the surface of a strawberry. 

We’ll explain all about haemangiomas and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH). 

Eighty percent of haemangiomas don’t develop any problems at all and, in those that do, the problems aren’t always severe. 

Reducing exposure to cryptosporidial infection: information for families with an immune-compromised child

This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) is for families with a child who is thought to be at particular risk from cryptosporidial infection. We hope that it will help you to understand something about the infection and advise on ways in which you can minimise the risk of acquiring the infection. The advice in this information is not applicable to children, young people and adults with a normal immune system.

Antroduodenal manometry

Manometry is a way of measuring how well the muscles and nerves in the digestive system are working. Antroduodenal manometry looks at the muscles and nerves in the stomach and small intestine. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the antroduodenal manometry test and what to expect when your child has one.

Treating and reducing the risk of pressure ulcers after leaving hospital

Our skin is the most important barrier against infection so we need to look after it carefully. Sometimes, for a variety of reasons, people who are unwell develop pressure ulcers. At Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), we recognise that children can develop pressure ulcers too. This information sheet explains about the steps you can continue to take at home to reduce the risk of your child developing a pressure ulcer. It also explains how to manage a pre-existing pressure ulcer at home.

Research and publications from the Psychological Medicine Service and National Tourette Syndrome Clinic

We have an ongoing programme of research, and you or your child may be invited to take part in a research project whilst under the care of the team. This is always entirely voluntary, and whether you choose to participate or not, your clinical care will not be affected. Any information gathered may be used anonymously for research purposes to improve our understanding and lead to better treatments for other children and families in the future.

Landau Kleffner Syndrome: language and communication

Children with Landau Kleffner Syndrome (LKS) experience a significant regression in their understanding and use of spoken language. This loss of skills often occurs at the onset of the disease and can be the first sign for families that something is wrong. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes how Landau Kleffner Syndrome (LKS) can affect a child’s language skills and outlines recommendations for input and support.