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Teenagers

It is normal for anyone (at any age) to feel apprehensive about coming into hospital. Teenagers already face the everyday challenges of growing older, balancing increasing amounts of schoolwork and enjoying downtime with their friends. Being unwell, needing treatment or spending any amount of time in hospital can be disruptive for young people and their families in addition to these usual demands.

Dinutuximab beta

Dinutuximab beta is used to treat a type of cancer called neuroblastoma, where a cancerous growth (tumour) develops in the nerve cells. Dinutuximab beta is a ‘biologic’ medicine, that is, it is a manmade version of a naturally occurring antibody. It works by stopping the neuroblastoma cells from growing. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what dinutuximab beta is, how it is given and some of the possible side 

Dasatinib

Dasatinib is used to treat various types of leukaemia (cancer of the white blood cells). Dasatinib is a ‘biologic’ medicine, that is, it is a manmade version of a naturally occurring molecule. It works by stopping the process that makes cancer cells grow and divide.This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what dasatinib is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. 

Raise a concern

At Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), we put children at the heart of everything we do. Our aim is to help your child to achieve as much as they can and have as good a quality of life as possible. However, we know that sometimes things go wrong and we do not get it right. Understanding your experiences can help us to see things that we may miss as members of staff.

Coronavirus (COVID-19): information for children, young people and families now shielding has paused

Government advice that shielding for those people most at risk of coronavirus (COVID-19) has been paused for the moment. This means that most people who have previously been shielding are now able to get out and about more.

There are still some groups of children and young people who should continue to shield – your clinical team will contact you if this is the case. Of course, if someone lives in an area that is now subject to ‘local lockdown’, they should continue to shield and stay at home as much as possible.

Therapeutic holding

When children and young people are scared, worried or distressed, they may not be able to cooperate with what is being asked of them. This is particularly true in hospitals, where there are new people looking after them, different surroundings and procedures that a child or young person might worry will hurt. Therapeutic holding is just one way of providing support to a child or young person who is struggling to cope with a situation, so together we can work out ways of aiming to achieve a set goal. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes how we will plan to help your child with a procedure that scares them and what you can do to help us. An Easy Read information sheet is included for your child.

Undescended testicles

This is when the child’s testicles are not in their usual place in the scrotum. Generally, only one of the testicles is affected, but on rare occasions, both testicles fail to travel to the scrotum. This page explains about undescended testicles, how they can be treated and what to expect when the child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH).

MRSA

MRSA is short for Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureusS. aureus is a bacterium (bug or germ) that about 30 per cent of us carry on our skin or in our nose without knowing about it. This is called 'colonisation'. This page explains about MRSA, how it is passed on and how it can be treated.It also explains about things we are doing at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) to reduce the chance of it spreading.

Rituximab

Rituximab is used to treat a range of inflammatory conditions, including cancers and leukaemia. It is a ‘biologic’ medicine, that is, it is a manmade version of a naturally occurring antibody. It works by removing a particular type of white blood cell (B lymphocytes) by sticking to the proteins on the surface of the cell. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what rituximab is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. 

Make a complaint

At Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), we put children at the heart of everything we do. Our aim is to help your child to achieve as much as they can and have as good a quality of life as possible. However, we know that sometimes we do not do as well as you would want. Understanding your experience can help us to see things that we may miss as members of staff.

We work in line with the NHS Complaints Regulations which set out how we respond to complaints, investigate what has happened and share with you what we have learned.