Search Results

Immunoglobulin treatment

Your doctor would like you to have some treatment to help keep you healthy. It is called immunoglobulin (pronounced ‘imm-you-no-glob-you-lin’). This leaflet will help you to understand a bit more about this treatment. It has been produced by PID UK in conjunction with Great Ormond Street Hospital and the Great North Children’s Hospital. 

Your stories

A patient story is a description of an experience of healthcare given by the person (or their representative) experiencing it. They tell the story in their own words – often helped by a formal or informal interview process. Stories have a beginning, middle and end and have characters – they are about people and how they interact with the processes of healthcare.

Laura Stiles

Laura gained a first class degree in Psychology in 2012. She joined GOSH in 2013 as a Cleft Clinic Information and Database Coordinator, where she was solely responsible for the organisation of the audit and data collection programme and maintenance of the Cleft Registry and Audit Network (CRANE...

Beki Moult

As well as managing information, Beki leads on equality and diversity issues affecting children, young people and families and the development of pathway and consent documentation. She is a member of the Patient Information Forum and the Pan-London NHS Equality and Diversity Leads Network. 

Emma James

Emma is the Patient Involvement and Engagement Officer at GOSH. She strives to ensure that children, young people and their families have a voice in the planning and delivery of care and services at GOSH.

Suzanne Collin

Suzanne has worked within a variety of departments within Great Ormond Street Hospital, including the Renal Unit, as the Clinical Data Lead for GOSH Nephrology & Urology Departments, British Association of Paediatric Nephrology (BAPN) and the UK and Ireland Cystinosis Registry. Within the...

Factor XIII deficiency

Factor XIII deficiency is a type of clotting disorder. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Factor XIII deficiency and where to get help.

Factor XI deficiency

Factor XI deficiency (also known as Haemophilia C, plasma thromboplastin antecedent deficiency or Rosenthal syndrome) is a clotting disorder. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Factor XI deficiency and where to get help.

Factor X deficiency

Factor X (previously known as the Stuart-Prower factor) deficiency is a type of clotting disorder. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Factor X deficiency and where to get help.

Factor VII deficiency

Factor VII deficiency (also known as Alexander’s disease) is a type of clotting disorder. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Factor VII deficiency and where to get help.

Factor V deficiency

Factor V deficiency (also occasionally known as Owren’s disease or parahaemophilia) is a clotting disorder. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Factor V deficiency and where to get help. 

Encephalocele

An encephalocele is a rare congenital (present at birth) type of neural tube defect where part of the skull has not formed properly so a portion of brain tissue and associated structures are outside the skull. The protruding sac may be covered with skin or it may be covered with a thin membrane. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of encephalocele and where to get help.