Search Results

If your child is ill

Some illnesses increase the usual risks of surgery and anaesthesia so we may feel it is safer to postpone your child’s procedure until they are well. The majority of planned procedures are non-urgent, so they can be safely postponed.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) – information for children, young people and families

We understand that you might be worried about coronavirus – also known as COVID-19 – particularly if your child has a long-term health condition.

This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) sets out our advice and the action we are taking to respond to the coronavirus outbreak. You can find guidance for specific patient groups here. Visit gosh.nhs.uk/staysafe to meet Otto the Octopus and find out how you can help reduce the spread of infection, whether you’re out and about or visiting GOSH.

GOSH siblings - have your say!

GOSH’s Patient Experience team is embarking on a project to better understand the experience and support received by patients’ siblings at the hospital. This week, the team has launched the Sibling Survey, which is aimed at capturing the views and stories of patients’ siblings across the hospital to identify what is important to them and the sort of support they would like.

Home Video Telemetry (HVT)

Telemetry is a test that looks at the function of the brain. The brain works by a series of nerve impulses, which cause electrical signals. These signals (also called brainwaves) can be recorded through the scalp. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the procedure for a Home Video Telemetry (HVT) test and what to expect when your child has one.

Sleep electroencephalogram (sleep EEG)

Electroencephalogram (EEG) is a test that looks at the function of the brain. The brain works by a series of nerve impulses, which cause electrical signals. These signals (also called brainwaves) can be recorded through the scalp. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the procedure for a Sleep EEG test and what to expect when your child has one.

Electroencephalogram (EEG)

An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a test that looks at the function of the brain. The brain works by a series of nerve impulses which cause electrical signals. These signals (also called brainwaves) can be recorded through the scalp. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the procedure for an EEG test and what to expect when your child has one.

Visual Evoked Potentials (VEP)

The brain works by a series of nerve impulses, which cause electrical signals within the brain. When a part of the body is stimulated, for instance, the eyes by a flashing light, or the ears by a clicking sound, the brain responds to this stimulation. This response is called an ‘evoked potential’. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the procedure for VEP test and what to expect when your child has one.

Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials (BAEP)

The brain works by a series of nerve impulses, which cause electrical signals within the brain. When a part of the body is stimulated, for instance, the eyes by a flashing light, or the ears by a clicking sound, the brain responds to this stimulation. This response is called an ‘evoked potential’. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the procedure for the Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials (BAEP) test and what to expect when your child has one.

Somatosensory Evoked Potentials (SSEP)

The brain works by a series of nerve impulses, which cause electrical signals within the brain. When a part of the body is stimulated, for instance, the eyes by a flashing light, or the ears by a clicking sound, the brain responds to this stimulation. This response is called an ‘evoked potential’. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the procedure for a Somatosensory Evoked Potentials (SSEP) test and what to expect when your child has one.

Evoked Potentials (EP)

The brain works by a series of nerve impulses, which cause electrical signals within the brain. When a part of the body is stimulated, for instance, the eyes by a flashing light, or the ears by a clicking sound, the brain responds to this stimulation. This response is called an ‘evoked potential’. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the procedure for Evoked Potential (EP) tests and what to expect when your child has one.

Therapeutic holding

When children and young people are scared, worried or distressed, they may not be able to cooperate with what is being asked of them. This is particularly true in hospitals, where there are new people looking after them, different surroundings and procedures that a child or young person might worry will hurt. Therapeutic holding is just one way of providing support to a child or young person who is struggling to cope with a situation, so together we can work out ways of aiming to achieve a set goal. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes how we will plan to help your child with a procedure that scares them and what you can do to help us. An Easy Read information sheet is included for your child.

Intramedullary rodding surgery for children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI)

Children and young people with Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) are more likely to develop fractures and bony changes such as bowing (bending) and shortening. Rodding surgery may be suggested or recommended by your child’s medical team. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about rodding surgery in osteogenesis imperfecta and what to expect when your child comes to GOSH for assessment and treatment.