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Meet our Genomics Team

At Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), we have a variety of scientist and technologist roles that help to transform our patients' lives through prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation. Here, you can meet some of the scientists and technologists in our Genetics laboratory, explore some of the exciting and varied opportunities and learn what it's like to work at GOSH. 

Refer a patient to the Feeding and Eating Disorders Service

We accept referrals of children and young people from 0 to 16 years of age who have feeding or eating difficulties that are causing significant difficulty, distress or impairment to development and everyday functioning. We can occasionally accept referrals of young people aged 17 on a case by case basis (please contact the Team Coordinator if you are considering making such a referral). We see children across the full spectrum of cognitive abilities, often with learning disabilities, pervasive developmental disorders and autism spectrum disorder, as well as children with co-morbid physical or mental health conditions.

About the Feeding and Eating Disorders Service

The team work in partnership with local services in order to ensure joined up working and to share the care and treatment of children and young people referred to us.  In most cases the children and young people that are referred to us will have had input and support from local professionals, for example: dietitians, paediatrics, gastroenterology, psychology, CAMHS, nursing, prior to being considered for a specialist service.

Obesity awareness week

To mark Obesity Awareness Week 2020 we caught up with Dr Lee Hudson, General Paediatrician and Consultant and Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) in a question and answer session for parents around childhood obesity and what can be done to prevent this.

Meet Martin

Martin is a pre-registered scientist in the Molecular laboratories. After a degree in biochemistry, Martin has since had an interesting and diverse career, applying skills generated from working in the aviation industry to his role as a technologist at GOSH. 

Meet Clinda

After completing work experience at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), Clinda was accepted on to the Scientists Training Programme (STP). Now, Clinda is a clinical scientist in the genetics laboratory, currently working on the 100,000 genomes project.

Juvenile Dermatomyositis (JDM)

Juvenile Dermatomyositis (JDM) is an autoimmune condition which means that the immune system which normally protects the body reacts abnormally and becomes overactive in normal tissues. This immune system reaction leads to inflammation (pain/redness/swelling) which can lead to possible tissue damage. In dermatomyositis, the inflammation affects mainly the small blood vessels in muscle (myositis) and skin (dermatitis). This inflammation may cause muscle weakness or pain and skin rashes particularly on the face, eyelids, knuckles, knees and elbows.

Kshitij (Kish) Mankad

Dr Kish Mankad is the Clinical Lead for Paediatric Neuroradiology at Great Ormond Street Hospital, having been a Consultant since 2011. His academic affiliation is with the GOS UCL Institute of Child Health. He also covers the Paediatric Neuroimaging at University College London Hospital.

Vinblastine

Vinblastine is a chemotherapy medicine that is used to treat certain types of cancer. It is also used to treat other conditions, such as Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what vinblastine is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. Each person reacts differently to medicines, so your child will not necessarily suffer from every side effect mentioned. If you have any questions or concerns, please speak to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Vincristine

Vincristine is a chemotherapy medicine that is used to treat certain types of cancer. It is also used to treat other conditions. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what vincristine is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. Each person reacts differently to medicines, so your child will not necessarily suffer from every side effect mentioned. If you have any questions or concerns, please speak to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

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