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About the dual sensory clinic

Many children and young people with difficulties affecting both vision and hearing are currently seen in separate clinics at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) but would benefit from being seen in a joint clinic. The clinic offers a one-stop assessment involving members of staff from both...

Blinatumomab

Blinatumomab is used to treat various types of leukaemia (cancer of the white blood cells). Blinatumomab is a ‘biologic’ medicine, that is, it is a manmade version of a naturally occurring antibody. It works by stopping the particular type of leukaemia cells from growing. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what blinatumomab is, how it is given and some of the possible side 

Dinutuximab beta

Dinutuximab beta is used to treat a type of cancer called neuroblastoma, where a cancerous growth (tumour) develops in the nerve cells. Dinutuximab beta is a ‘biologic’ medicine, that is, it is a manmade version of a naturally occurring antibody. It works by stopping the neuroblastoma cells from growing. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what dinutuximab beta is, how it is given and some of the possible side 

Rituximab

Rituximab is used to treat a range of inflammatory conditions, including cancers and leukaemia. It is a ‘biologic’ medicine, that is, it is a manmade version of a naturally occurring antibody. It works by removing a particular type of white blood cell (B lymphocytes) by sticking to the proteins on the surface of the cell. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what rituximab is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. 

Gemtuzumab

Gemtuzumab is used to treat a type of leukaemia. It is often given in combination with medicines called mitoxantrone and cytarabine. Gemtuzumab is a ‘biologic’ medicine, that is, it is a manmade version of a naturally occurring antibody. It works by targeting proteins on the surface of cancer cells so that they die. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what gemtuzumab is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. 

Imatinib

Imatinib is a chemotherapy medicine used to treat certain types of cancer. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what imatinib is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. 

Ifosfamide

Ifosfamide is a chemotherapy medicine used to treat certain types of cancer. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what ifosfamide is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. 

Fludarabine

Fludarabine is a chemotherapy medicine used to treat certain types of leukaemia such as acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and bone marrow transplants. This information sheet explains what fludarabine is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. 

Lomustine

Lomustine is a chemotherapy medicine used to treat certain types of cancer. It is also sometimes known as CCNU. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what lomustine is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. 

Irinotecan

Irinotecan is a chemotherapy medicine used for the treatment of certain types of cancer. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what irinotecan is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. 

Laser treatment for birthmarks

Laser treatment, with a pulsed dye laser, is currently the treatment of choice for improving the colour of a capillary malformation (port wine stain). When laser treatment is carried out at a specialist centre, the results can be excellent and the side effects minimal. Laser treatment can also be used for other vascular conditions. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes laser treatment for birthmarks and what to expect when your child has treatment. 

Dasatinib

Dasatinib is used to treat various types of leukaemia (cancer of the white blood cells). Dasatinib is a ‘biologic’ medicine, that is, it is a manmade version of a naturally occurring molecule. It works by stopping the process that makes cancer cells grow and divide.This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what dasatinib is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. 

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