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Privacy

GOSH takes the same care of your information as we do your health. For more information about how we protect and use your personal information, you can read our new Privacy Notice below.

We are always looking at ways to improve our website, and use a range of tools that help us to make sure that it meets your needs. This website does not store or capture personal information unless submitted by you through one of our website forms. The Trust does not make any attempt to find out the identities of those visiting our website, but merely logs general visitor data which is collected and used to improve and maintain the website for the visitors’ benefit. For more information on the data collected by this website, access the GOSH cookie policy

Information held about you and your child: information for families

CAMHS Simulation Programme

Overview

This one day simulation based study day focuses on the technical and non-technical elements of safe and effective care for children and young people with mental health conditions. By attending this study day, participants will be able to rehearse the skills required to enhance...

When A Child Dies

Overview

Topics covered in this course include conversations around anticipation of death, the death of an infant, and transfer to the mortuary.

Actors are employed to provide a family for the simulated scenario elements. This provides the opportunity to experience caring for a...

Sirolimus 1mg/1ml oral solution to treat congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI)

Sirolimus (also known as rapamycin) is an immunosuppressant medicine, which damps down the immune system. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about sirolimus (also known as rapamycin) oral solution, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. Each person reacts differently to medicines, so your child will not necessarily suffer every side effect mentioned.

Giving subcutaneous injections

A subcutaneous injection is given into the subcutaneous fat under the skin. The skin is made up of different layers. Underneath the epidermis and dermis, which contain sweat glands and hair follicles, is a layer of fat. This is the area into which subcutaneous injections are given. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about subcutaneous injections and why they might be needed. It also describes how to give a subcutaneous injection to your child and should act as a reminder for the teaching you received at GOSH.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) – information for children, young people and families

We understand that you might be worried about coronavirus – also known as COVID-19 – particularly if your child has a long-term health condition.

This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) sets out our advice and the action we are taking to respond to the coronavirus outbreak. You can find guidance for specific patient groups here. Visit gosh.nhs.uk/staysafe to meet Otto the Octopus and find out how you can help reduce the spread of infection, whether you’re out and about or visiting GOSH.

GOSH siblings - have your say!

GOSH’s Patient Experience team is embarking on a project to better understand the experience and support received by patients’ siblings at the hospital. This week, the team has launched the Sibling Survey, which is aimed at capturing the views and stories of patients’ siblings across the hospital to identify what is important to them and the sort of support they would like.

Home Video Telemetry (HVT)

Telemetry is a test that looks at the function of the brain. The brain works by a series of nerve impulses, which cause electrical signals. These signals (also called brainwaves) can be recorded through the scalp. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the procedure for a Home Video Telemetry (HVT) test and what to expect when your child has one.

Sleep electroencephalogram (sleep EEG)

Electroencephalogram (EEG) is a test that looks at the function of the brain. The brain works by a series of nerve impulses, which cause electrical signals. These signals (also called brainwaves) can be recorded through the scalp. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the procedure for a Sleep EEG test and what to expect when your child has one.

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