Research and Innovation

Carrying out research into the best way to fight children’s illnesses has been one of our three main ambitions ever since our hospital opened in 1852.

We’ve come a long way since then and, with our research partner the UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health (ICH), we now form the largest paediatric centre in Europe dedicated to both clinical and basic scientific research.

Read our latest stories - and find out about our research opportunities.

We are committed to carrying out pioneering research to find treatments and cures for some of the most complex illnesses, for the benefit of children here in the UK and worldwide.

Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) and UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health (ICH) were awarded NIHR Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) status in 2007, and had the award renewed in 2011. This was in recognition of the research conducted in the organisation. We are the only paediatric BRC in the UK.

Discover more about research and innovation at GOSH and the ICH.

Read our latest patient stories and find out about our research opportunities.

Find out more about the research infrastructure and facilities we have available.

Information for commercial and academic partners about how to work with us.

Learn more about the support and resources available to researchers. 

Research news

Learn about the latest research and innovation at Great Ormond Street Hospital.

Leukaemia trial shows promise and complexity of genome-edited cell therapies

A ‘one size fits all’ immune therapy developed at the UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health (ICH) could help to clear cancerous cells in children and adults who have exhausted all other treatment options for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (B-ALL), while side effects remain a continuing challenge, according to the results of an early-stage clinical trial.

GOSH researchers join experts in warning of the detrimental impact of a no deal Brexit on rare diseases

Experts have warned that a ‘no deal’ Brexit will result in the exclusion of the UK from the 24 European Reference Networks (ERNs) that were established to improve the care of patients bearing the lifelong burden of a rare disease, which require highly specialised diagnosis and treatment.

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