UCL GOS Institute for Child Health Gold Athena SWAN award

15 Oct 2020, 10:55 a.m.

Great Ormond Street Hospital’s academic partner, the UCL Great Ormond Street Institute for Child Health (GOS ICH), has been awarded GOLD status through Athena SWAN for its work to improve gender equality and diversity.

The Athena SWAN charter recognises and celebrates practices in research institutions, like the GOS ICH, that promote the advancement of women in science. The GOS ICH was praised for its broad inclusive approach and attempts to incorporate all staff into all activity to improve gender equality. The panel also commended the positive, constructive, and supportive approach they had in response to COVID-19, and their focus on mitigating disparities and inequalities.

GOS ICH Director, Professor Rosalind Smyth, said: “I am immensely proud of this exceptional achievement, which reflects the very positive approach to equality, diversity and inclusion within our community and the hard work of all who have implemented this critically important part of our academic strategy. There are still areas where we need to improve and there are other challenges ahead so we will not be complacent.”

Previously, the GOS ICH had Silver status. This was needed for GOSH and the GOS ICH to be awarded an NIHR Biomedical Research Centre status in 2015.

As an NHS Trust, GOSH is not eligible for an Athena SWAN award. However, the Trust is fully committed to ensuring a more diverse and inclusive workforce. GOSH has recently implemented a new Diversity and Inclusion Framework and set up a Women’s Forum to develop more focus in this area.

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