BBC Songs of Praise comes to GOSH

16 May 2022, 9 a.m.

Caitlin at GOSH

Our wonderful families and staff feature in the latest episode of Songs of Praise capturing an insight to the invaluable care and support our chaplaincy team provide.

In the programme, staff, patients and families share their connection with the hospital and tell stories of resilience and hope.

Deputy Senior Chaplain, Dorothy Moore Brooks, shows presenter Aled Jones around our 19th century chapel and roof garden where he learns about the role of the chaplaincy in the hospital. He also meets Maura O'Callaghan, Lead ECMO Nurse, who shares her experience of working at GOSH for over 30 years.

JB Gill speaks with Jess and her family, who since losing their daughter, Anna, 10 years ago to mitochondrial disease, have continued to fundraise for a cure for the condition through a Brighter Future Fund set up with GOSH Charity in Anna's memory. Aled Jones also meets 17-year-old Caitlin who recently had a heart transplant and shares her time at GOSH.

Watch GOSH on Songs of Praise on BBC iPlayer

Chaplaincy and Spiritual Care at GOSH

Our Chaplaincy and Spiritual Care team play a key role in supporting people through some of their most difficult, stressful, or confusing times.

The team – made up of members from different faiths – provide support through listening, talking, praying together, or simply just being there. They are available 24 hours a day for all staff, patients and families and are there for everyone, of any faith or none.

We work as one team as we share a vision to have our presence for families. We learn and share from each other to find how we can move forward with great results. It always a joy to learn from each other’s culture and faith, for me it’s constant learning.

Romana Kazmi, Senior Chaplain (Muslim)

The multi-faith team also ensure there are quiet places open at all times for reflection within the hospital. These include St Christopher’s Chapel, the Muslim Prayer Room, the Shabbat Room, and a non-denominational space too.

Current members of the team are ordained or lay members from a variety of faith communities represent the Church of England, Roman Catholicism, Judaism and Islam. Other belief communities and religion representatives are also available when requested.

In Chaplaincy, staff, families and patients privilege us with sharing their stories and allowing us to be a part of them.

The multi-faith team allows us the opportunity to celebrate feasts together, hear one another’s traditions and grow. I can think of no place that exemplifies caring, growing and healing more than here.

Jim Linthicum, Lead Chaplain

The chaplaincy service is funded by GOSH Charity as part of their ongoing support of patient, family and staff wellbeing.

Caitlin’s story

17-year-old Caitlin recently had a heart transplant, and features on Songs of Praise.

Born with a complex congenital heart condition, by the age of 13, Caitlin had two strokes, and was put on the heart transplant waiting list when she was 14.

Due to complications after the transplant, Caitlin spent a total of 262 days at the hospital. During this time, she underwent multiple surgeries and GOSH became a home away from home.

Caitlin at GOSH

Caitlin at GOSH

Caitlin and her parents, Ingrid and Barry, share their experience with presenter Aled Jones, and explain how their faith supported them through the hardest of times.

The team at GOSH never gave up fighting for me.

Caitlin

For Caitlin’s family, the Chaplaincy and Spiritual Care Service played an incredibly important role in supporting them at their time of need.

Now back at home, Caitlin is living life to the full – spending time with her family and friends, and looking to the future.

All of this was only made possible thanks to the brave decision of the donor family, for that we will be forever grateful.

Ingrid, Caitlin’s mum
Caitlin

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