Procedures and treatments

Preparing a child for a procedure or treatment can be an anxious occasion. Great Ormond Street Hospital have produced a number of factsheets to help explain what will happen and what to expect.

Procedures and treatments search

Search for information on procedures and treatments at Great Ormond Street Hospital.

Treating and reducing the risk of pressure ulcers after leaving hospital

Our skin is the most important barrier against infection so we need to look after it carefully. Sometimes, for a variety of reasons, people who are unwell develop pressure ulcers. At Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), we recognise that children can develop pressure ulcers too. This information sheet explains about the steps you can continue to take at home to reduce the risk of your child developing a pressure ulcer. It also explains how to manage a pre-existing pressure ulcer at home.

Holistic Needs Assessments for children with cancer and their families

We realise that when your child is diagnosed with cancer, this can affect many areas of family life. This is why you will be offered an appointment with your keyworker at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) to discuss your family’s concerns and situation as well as what help is available. This is called a Holistic Needs Assessment.

Reducing exposure to cryptosporidial infection: information for families with an immune-compromised child

This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) is for families with a child who is thought to be at particular risk from cryptosporidial infection. We hope that it will help you to understand something about the infection and advise on ways in which you can minimise the risk of acquiring the infection. The advice in this information is not applicable to children, young people and adults with a normal immune system.

If you see it, say it – raising concerns about your child

While everyone at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) is an expert in their field, you are the expert in your child. You will know better than us if they are not behaving as they usually do or seem different in some way. Studies have shown that caregivers are often the first people to spot changes in the health of their child, even when in a clinical environment.

One-way (speaking) valves

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about one-way (speaking) valves, what they do and how to encourage your child to wear the valve. A one-way valve is a plastic attachment that fits on to the end of your child’s tracheostomy tube.