Procedures and treatments

Preparing a child for a procedure or treatment can be an anxious occasion. Great Ormond Street Hospital have produced a number of factsheets to help explain what will happen and what to expect.

Procedures and treatments search

Search for information on procedures and treatments at Great Ormond Street Hospital.

Pre-operative hygiene

An important part of our daily routine is to keep ourselves clean – this is a major part of preventing infection – your skin is the physical barrier that keeps out germs and bugs. It is also very important that you take good care of your teeth and gums – this too will help reduce your chances of getting an infection.

Any operation or procedure poses a risk of infection, although in most cases this risk is low. Your surgeon will discuss the specific risk to your child, as it depends on the type of operation your child is having. Almost all operations involving breaking the skin in some way – either through an incision (cut), through a cannula (thin plastic tube) placed into a blood vessel, or by having a tube in your mouth (to help you breath during their operation). The risk of infection getting inside the body can be reduced by having clean skin and good mouth care.

Here we explain why it is so important for your child to have clean skin and good mouth care before the operation and what measures we have put in place at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) to reduce the risk of infection before, during and after an operation.

Tendon sheath injections

Tendon sheath injections are suggested when the tissues around a tendon are painful, swollen or difficult to move. Tendon sheath injections on their own are unlikely to offer a cure, but can be helpful alongside other treatments such as physiotherapy, splinting and other longer term medicines.

Your child is having an MRI scan using 'feed and wrap' technique

An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses a magnetic field rather than X-rays to take pictures of your child’s body. The MRI scanner is a hollow machine with a tube running horizontally through its middle. ‘Feed and wrap’ is a technique used with young babies instead of sedation or general anaesthesia. Generally, babies tend to fall asleep after a feed, so we take advantage of this and scan them while asleep.

Antroduodenal manometry

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about antroduodenal manometry. Antroduodenal manometry is a test to measure how well the muscles and nerves in the stomach and small intestine work. These move rhythmically to push food and drink through this part of your child’s digestive system and into the colon (large intestine).