Procedures and treatments

Preparing a child for a procedure or treatment can be an anxious occasion. Great Ormond Street Hospital have produced a number of factsheets to help explain what will happen and what to expect.

Procedures and treatments search

Search for information on procedures and treatments at Great Ormond Street Hospital.

Distraction

Sometimes children or young people find aspects of their hospital visits challenging, uncomfortable or distressing. They may express this in ways including becoming anxious, crying, shouting or physically resisting staff. This is not only distressing for them, but also for parents and carers, and staff attempting to carry out treatment or consultations. Children and young people can be helped through painful or difficult procedures with support, including distraction and play. 

Antroduodenal manometry

Manometry is a way of measuring how well the muscles and nerves in the digestive system are working. Antroduodenal manometry looks at the muscles and nerves in the stomach and small intestine. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the antroduodenal manometry test and what to expect when your child has one.

Colonic transit (pellet) study

A colonic transit study is a test that shows how quickly food passes through the digestive system. This may also be called a pellet study.  It starts when you give your child some pellets to swallow on three consecutive days. On the fourth day, they will need to come into hospital for an x-ray. If there are some pellets seen on this x-ray you might be asked to return for a second x-ray on day 7. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the transit study test and what to expect when your child has one.

Gastrojejunostomy (transgastric jejunal) feeding device care

A gastrostomy is a surgical opening through the skin of the abdomen to the stomach. A gastrojejunostomy device is inserted through this opening to the stomach and then on to the first part of the small intestine (jejunum). This means that liquid feed can be delivered directly into the small intestine bypassing the mouth, throat and stomach. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes the procedure to insert a gastrojejunostomy feeding device and explains the care it will need afterwards.

Bone anchored hearing aids (BAHA)

A bone anchored hearing aid (BAHA) is similar to other hearing aids, but instead of being inserted into the ear canal or held behind the ear, it is attached to a soft band worn on the head or fixed to a metal implant inserted into the skull. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes the type of BAHAs used at GOSH, what is involved in fitting them and what to expect during treatment.