Procedures and treatments

Preparing a child for a procedure or treatment can be an anxious occasion. Great Ormond Street Hospital have produced a number of factsheets to help explain what will happen and what to expect.

Procedures and treatments search

Search for information on procedures and treatments at Great Ormond Street Hospital.

Endovenous laser treatment

Endovenous laser treatment (EVLT) is a way of treating abnormal and enlarged veins so that they shrink and become less troublesome. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about endovenous laser treatment (EVLT), why it might be suggested and what to expect when your child comes for treatment. 

Liver biopsy

The liver is the largest organ in the body and is located in the top right hand side of the abdomen. It makes proteins that travel around in the blood, and also breaks down waste products so they can be passed out in urine (wee) or faeces (poo). This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what happens when your child has a liver biopsy. 

Venous sclerotherapy

Venous sclerotherapy is a procedure used to treat venous malformations. Venous malformations are made up of extra veins that have no use and cause problems. This page explains about venous sclerotherapy, why it might be suggested and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for the procedure. 

Thrombolysis and thrombectomy

Blood contains cells called platelets and a substance called fibrinogen that allow the blood to clot. In normal circumstances, clotting is a good thing as it prevents blood loss from an injury such as a cut or graze. However, when a blood clot forms inside a blood vessel, it can cause serious problems. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about how a blood clot is diagnosed and the various forms of treatment (thrombolysis and thrombectomy) that may follow.

Tube oesophagram 

A tube oesophagram is a specialised type of imaging scan used when a child is suspected of having a tracheo-oesophageal fistula. Tracheo-oesophageal fistula (TOF) is a rare condition, where part of the oesophagus (gullet or foodpipe) is joined (fistula) to the trachea (windpipe).This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the tube oesophagram procedure, what it involves and what to expect when your child comes to GOSH to have one.

Pain relief using Entonox®

When coming into hospital, children, young people and their families are often worried that they may be in pain. Entonox® is a gas – a mixture of half oxygen and half nitrous oxide that is used for pain relief. Entonox® can also be called ‘gas and air’ or ‘laughing gas’. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains how Entonox® works, when it is most suitable and what to expect when your child uses Entonox® for pain relief.