Procedures and treatments

Preparing a child for a procedure or treatment can be an anxious occasion. Great Ormond Street Hospital have produced a number of factsheets to help explain what will happen and what to expect.

Procedures and treatments search

Search for information on procedures and treatments at Great Ormond Street Hospital.

Your child is having an echocardiogram under sedation

Echocardiograms (Echo) are one of the most frequently used scans for diagnosing heart problems. An Echo is an ultrasound scan of the heart. As your child will need to lie very still for the scan, we may suggest that they have sedation to help. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about echocardiograms, what is involved and what to expect when your child has the scan.

Bronchoscopy, bronchogram and optical coherence tomography studies

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about bronchoscopy and bronchogram (B&B) studies and also the optical coherence tomography (OCT) study, which can be carried out during the same procedure. It explains why these may be suggested and what to expect. This combination of tests is carried out in the Interventional Radiology department. 

Nephrostogram studies

A nephrostogram study looks at your child’s nephrostomy tube, which drains urine from the kidney into a special bag. It uses contrast liquid, which shows up well on x-rays, inserted into the nephrostomy. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about nephrostogram studies, what is involved and what to expect when your child has one. 

Linogram studies

A linogram study looks at your child’s central venous access device – either a central venous catheter (CVC), implantable port or peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) – when it is not working as well as it should. This page explains about linogram studies of central venous access devices, what is involved and what to expect when your child has one at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH).
 

MIBG scan

An MIBG scan is used to look for uncontrolled or abnormal cell growth in the body. It works by injecting a substance called an isotope into your child’s veins. The MIBG scan is named after the chemical ‘iodine-131-metaiodobenzylguanidine’ or MIBG for short, to which the isotope is attached.

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