Medicines information

The information in this section describes medicines, how they are given and some of their possible side effects.

If you have any questions or concerns about medications, please ask your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Medicines search

Search for information on medicines at Great Ormond Street Hospital.

What to expect from a non-medical prescriber

Since May 2006, some nurses and pharmacists have been allowed to prescribe medicines that were previously only allowed to be prescribed by doctors. Non-medical prescribing has been introduced to improve patients’ access to treatment – that is, making it easier for you to get the medicines you need for your child. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the process. 

Adalimumab injections

Anti-TNF medicines, such as adalimumab, etanercept and infliximab, act against a protein in the blood called Tissue Necrosis Factor Alpha (TNFα). This protein can cause inflammation when it is present in large amounts in the blood.

Multiple sclerosis disease-modifying drugs: second line treatments

Most young people with Multiple sclerosis (MS), who are eligible for treatment, will be offered first line treatments. In certain situations, or if the first line treatments have not worked adequately, then your child may be offered the possibility of trying a second line medication. These medications, like the first line treatments, work by interacting with the immune system and calming the inflammation that is attacking the central nervous system.