Medicines information

The information in this section describes medicines, how they are given and some of their possible side effects.

If you have any questions or concerns about medications, please ask your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Medicines search

Search for information on medicines at Great Ormond Street Hospital.

Furosemide

Furosemide belongs to a group of drugs called diuretics which increase the amount of urine produced. Furosemide is a medicine used in patients with heart and kidney problems to stop fluid building up in the body and so reduce the workload on the heart.

Propranolol

Propranolol belongs to a group of drugs called beta blockers. It is used in patients with heart problems to control high blood pressure or irregular heart beats.This information sheet describes how this medicine is given and some of its possible side effects.

Lisinopril

Lisinopril belongs to a group of drugs called ACE inhibitors. Lisinopril is used in children with heart problems to lower the blood pressure and help reduce the workload of the heart. This information sheet describes how this medicine is given and some of its possible side effects.

Enalapril

Enalapril belongs to a group of drugs called ACE inhibitors. They are used in children with heart problems to lower blood pressure and help reduce the workload of the heart. This information sheet describes how this medicine is given and some of its possible side effects.

Digoxin

Digoxin is a medicine used when the heart does not pump properly. It is also used to treat some abnormal heart rhythms. This information sheet describes how this medicine is given and some of its possible side effects.

Atenolol

Atenolol belongs to a group of medicines called beta blockers. Atenolol is a medicine used in patients with heart problems to lower the blood pressure and lower the heart rate. This information sheet describes how this medicine is given and some of its possible side effects.

Ambrisentan

Ambrisentan belongs to a group of medicines called ‘endothelin receptor antagonists’. It is prescribed at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) to treat pulmonary hypertension (high blood pressure in the blood vessels in the lungs).

Lanreotide injections

Lanreotide is used to treat persistently low blood sugar levels (hypoglycaemia) caused by the body producing too much insulin (hyperinsulinism). This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes lanreotide injections, how they are given and some of its side effects. Each person reacts different to medicines so your child will not necessarily suffer every side effect mentioned.

Octreotide injections

Octreotide is used to treat persistently low blood sugar levels (hypoglycaemia) caused by the body producing too much insulin (hyperinsulinism). This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes octreotide injections, how they are given and some of its side effects. Each person reacts different to medicines so your child will not necessarily suffer every side effect mentioned.

Diazoxide and chlorothiazide suspensions

Diazoxide is used to treat persistently low blood sugar levels (hypoglycaemia) caused by the body producing too much insulin (hyperinsulinism). Chlorothiazide is a diuretic, that is, a medicine that increases the amount of urine produced by the kidneys. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes diazoxide and chlorothiazide, which are usually prescribed together. It explains how they are given and some of their side effects. Each person reacts differently to medicines so your child will not necessarily suffer every side effect mentioned.