Medicines information

The information in this section describes medicines, how they are given and some of their possible side effects.

If you have any questions or concerns about medications, please ask your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

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Search for information on medicines at Great Ormond Street Hospital.

Enzymes in cystic fibrosis 

Digestive enzymes are made in the pancreas. The fat, protein and carbohydrate in food is broken down by the enzymes to release nutrients. „„In cystic fibrosis (CF) sticky mucus blocks the passages from the pancreas to the small intestine which stops the enzymes working, so the food cannot be digested or absorbed by the body. This is called malabsorption and causes loose or oily stools, wind, stomach ache and poor weight gain.

Diazoxide and chlorothiazide suspensions

This information should be read in conjunction with any patient information leaflet provided by the manufacturer.

This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes diazoxide and chlorothiazide suspensions, which are usually prescribed together. It explains how they are given and some of their side effects. Each person reacts differently to medicines so your child will not necessarily suffer every side effect mentioned. If you have any questions or concerns, please ask your doctor, nurse or pharmacist or telephone one of the contact numbers.

Octreotide injections

Octreotide is used at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) to treat persistently low blood sugar levels (hypoglycaemia) caused by the body producing too much insulin (hyperinsulinism). This information describes octreotide injections, how they are given and some of its side effects.

Melphalan

Melphalan is a chemotherapy medicine used before bone marrow transplant or high dose therapy with stem cell rescue to help treat certain types of cancer, immunology and metabolic conditions.

Special handling requirements for oral cytotoxics and immunosuppressant medicines

Cytotoxic medicines are used to kill or damage abnormal cells. There are many different kinds with many different uses. This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes how oral cytotoxic and immunosuppressant medicines should be given. It also provides advice on how to handle these medicines safely.