Conditions we treat

Want to know more about the conditions we treat at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH)? Just search below:

Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM)

Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is a rare inflammatory condition that affects the brain and spinal cord. It often follows on from a minor infection such as a cold, and is the result of the immune system becoming mis-programmed, and activating immune cells to attack the healthy myelin (a fatty protective coating) covering the nerves. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes the symptoms, causes and treatment of ADEM.

Tourette syndrome

Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neurological (brain) condition. The main signs of TS are motor and vocal tics. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains some basic facts about Tourette Syndrome (TS). 

Subglottic stenosis

The subglottis is just below the vocal cords at the bottom of the voice box (larynx). It is the narrowest part of a child’s airway. Subglottic stenosis is a narrowing of the subglottic airway. Doctors do not know how many children are affected by subglottic stenosis, but we see around 200 children with the condition each year at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH).

Gastro-oesophageal reflux

When a baby or child has gastro-oesophageal reflux, the food and drink travels down the foodpipe as normal. However, some of the mixture of food, drink and acid travels back up the foodpipe, instead of passing through to the large and small intestines. As the food and drink is mixed with acid from the stomach, it can irritate the lining of the foodpipe, making it sore. This is gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

Choanal atresia

Choanal atresia is a rare condition that is present from birth, in which the nasal passages are blocked by bone or tissue. This condition can affect one or both nasal passages. This page explains about choanal atresia and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for treatment.

Landau Kleffner syndrome

Landau Kleffner syndrome (LKS) is a rare epilepsy. It occurs in children usually between the ages of three and nine years and is characterised by loss of language skills and silent electrical seizures during sleep. It may be associated with convulsive seizures and additional difficulties with behaviour, social interaction, motor skills and learning. It is not usually life-threatening, but can impact greatly on quality of life unless it responds well to treatment. It occurs in approximately one child in a million. The disease is more common in boys and does not usually run in families.