Conditions we treat

Want to know more about the conditions we treat at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH)? Just search below:

Anorectal anomaly

An anorectal anomaly is a disorder affecting the anus and the rectum, the last part of the digestive system.This page explains about anorectal anomaly, how it can be treated and what to expect when a child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH).

Tourette syndrome

Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neurological (brain) condition. The main signs of TS are motor and vocal tics. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains some basic facts about Tourette Syndrome (TS). 

Subglottic stenosis

The subglottis is just below the vocal cords at the bottom of the voice box (larynx). It is the narrowest part of a child’s airway. Subglottic stenosis is a narrowing of the subglottic airway. Doctors do not know how many children are affected by subglottic stenosis, but we see around 200 children with the condition each year at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH).

Choanal atresia

Choanal atresia is a rare condition that is present from birth, in which the nasal passages are blocked by bone or tissue. This condition can affect one or both nasal passages. This page explains about choanal atresia and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for treatment.

Landau Kleffner syndrome

Landau Kleffner syndrome (LKS) is a rare epilepsy. It occurs in children usually between the ages of three and nine years and is characterised by loss of language skills and silent electrical seizures during sleep. It may be associated with convulsive seizures and additional difficulties with behaviour, social interaction, motor skills and learning. It is not usually life-threatening, but can impact greatly on quality of life unless it responds well to treatment. It occurs in approximately one child in a million. The disease is more common in boys and does not usually run in families.

Skull fracture

A skull fracture is when bone in the skull has been broken by an injury or trauma. As the skull is very strong, it takes a lot of force to damage it. This might be from falling from a height, a car accident or a direct blow to the head.

Obsessive compulsive disorder

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is an anxiety disorder characterised by intrusive, distressing, unwanted thoughts (obsessions) and time-consuming, senseless rituals (compulsions). OCD occurs in about one per cent of the population and is therefore fairly common, which means it is helpful for school staff to know about it.