Conditions we treat

Want to know more about the conditions we treat at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH)? Just search below:

Myelomeningocele

Myelomeningocele is a type of spina bifida. This is when the neural tube has failed to close and the neural tissue is exposed on the baby’s back. The myelomeningocele will look like a sac sticking out from a baby’s back. 

Optic neuritis

Optic neuritis (ON) is an attack of inflammation (swelling) of the optic nerve. The optic nerve is important in sending information from the eye to the brain about what we are seeing. ON is caused by the body’s immune system becoming mis-programmed and activating immune cells to attack the healthy myelin covering the optic nerve.

Syndactyly

Syndactyly means 'joined digits' and may involve webbing of the skin, or include fusion of the underlying bones. This may be along part or the whole length of the finger. It is the second most common congenital hand problem and occurs in around 1 in 1,000 births.

Undescended testicles

This is when the child’s testicles are not in their usual place in the scrotum. Generally, only one of the testicles is affected, but on rare occasions, both testicles fail to travel to the scrotum. This page explains about undescended testicles, how they can be treated and what to expect when the child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH).

Hernia

Hernias develop when there is a weak area in the abdomen or a small opening in the abdominal muscles, causing the tissues below to bulge. Both children and adults can have hernias.

Oesophageal atresia with tracheo-oesophageal fistula

Oesophageal atresia (OA) is a rare condition where a short section at the top of the oesophagus (gullet or foodpipe) has not formed properly so is not connected to the stomach. This means food cannot pass from the throat to the stomach. Tracheo-oesophageal fistula (TOF) is another rare condition, which tends to occur alongside oesophageal atresia. This is where part of the oesophagus is joined to the trachea (windpipe). This page explains about oesophageal atresia and tracheooesophageal fistula, how they are treated and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for treatment.

Intussusception

Intussusception is a condition where the bowel ‘telescopes’ in on itself. This causes the bowel walls to press on one another, blocking the bowel. This can lead to reduced blood flow to that part of the bowel. It is a bit like a getting a sock turned inside itself. This page explains about intussusception, how it is treated and what to expect when a child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH).