Conditions we treat

Want to know more about the conditions we treat at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH)? Just search below:

Bowel incontinence

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains why bowel incontinence (encopresis or soiling) can occur in toilet-trained children and young people. It also gives suggestions for treatment and strategies to try at home to improve the situation.

Haemophilia B

Haemophilia B (also known as Factor IX deficiency) is a type of clotting disorder, much rarer than Haemophilia A (Classic Haemophilia or Factor VIII deficiency). A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Haemophilia B and where to get help.

Von Willebrand disease

Von Willebrand disease is a type of clotting disorder – more common than the better known haemophilia. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. Von Willebrand disease is named after the doctor first described the condition in the early 20th Century. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Von Willebrand disease and where to get help. 

Aplastic anaemia

Aplastic anaemia is a serious condition affecting the blood, where the bone marrow and stem cells do not produce enough blood cells. It is also called bone marrow failure and can happen suddenly (acute) or develop over a period of time (chronic). This page explains about aplastic anaemia, how it is treated and what to expect when a child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for treatment. 

Coats' disease

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Coats Disease, a rare eye condition. It also explains what problems to look out for after diagnosis and sources of further information and support.

Landau Kleffner Syndrome: language and communication

Children with Landau Kleffner Syndrome (LKS) experience a significant regression in their understanding and use of spoken language. This loss of skills often occurs at the onset of the disease and can be the first sign for families that something is wrong. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes how Landau Kleffner Syndrome (LKS) can affect a child’s language skills and outlines recommendations for input and support.