Conditions we treat

Want to know more about the conditions we treat at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH)? Just search below:

Carpenter syndrome

Carpenter syndrome is a type of craniosynostosis named after the doctor who first described the condition. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Carpenter syndrome (also known as acrocephalopolysyndactyly type 2 or ACPS II).

Freeman-Sheldon syndrome

Freeman-Sheldon syndrome (previously known as Whistling Face syndrome) is a rare genetic condition that affects the mouth, face, hands and feet. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Freeman Sheldon syndrome.

Craniofacial microsomia

Craniofacial microsomia is a condition where one or both sides of the face (facial) is underdeveloped (microsomia). This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of craniofacial microsomia (also known as hemifacial microsomia or Goldenhar syndrome) and where to get help.

Bronchiolitis

PLEASE NOTE in the light of the current coronavirus (COVID-19) situation, we have created an FAQ with COVID-19 information for children, young people and families at GOSH.

Bronchiolitis is a common chest infection that usually affects babies under a year old. Although many get better without treatment, a small number of children will need hospital treatment, occasionally in the intensive care unit. Here we explain the causes and symptoms of bronchiolitis, the treatment available and where to get help.

Medication overuse headache

Medication overuse headache (MOH) develops and gets worse with frequent use of any medication treatment for headache or migraine. It is also known as ‘rebound headache’. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of medication overuse headache and where to get help.

New daily persistent headache

New daily persistent headache (NDPH) is a type of persistent headache that starts suddenly and happens on a daily basis with migraine-like or tension-like features. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of NDPH and where to get help.

Paroxysmal hemicrania

Paroxysmal hemicrania (PH) is a rare form of headache under the classification of Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalagias (TACs). PH is a debilitating one-sided headache affecting the area around the eye. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the two types of PH with episodic paroxysmal hemicrania and chronic paroxysmal hemicrania and where to get help.

Ventriculomegaly

Ventriculomegaly is the medical term used to describe enlargement of the ventricles of the brain. Hydrocephalus is the term used when enlargement of the ventricles has been caused by an increase in the pressure of the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) within them. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of ventriculomegaly and hydrocephalus and where to get help.

Generalised lymphatic anomaly (GLA)

Generalised lymphatic anomaly (GLA) – previously known as lymphangiomatosis – is the name given to a rare, congenital (present at birth), and progressive disorder of lymphatic channels which can affect different organs including the bones and the intestines. It can cause problems if the abnormal lymphatic tissue develops within important tissues and structures. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of generalised lymphatic anomalies (GLA) and where to get help.