Conditions we treat

Want to know more about the conditions we treat at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH)? Just search below:

Parry-Romburg syndrome

Parry-Romburg syndrome (also known as Progressive Hemifacial Atrophy) is a rare condition affecting the skin and soft tissues on one side of the face (hemifacial). It is considered to be within the group of conditions called morphoea and is named after the two doctors who first described it in the mid-19th century. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Parry-Romburg syndrome.

Opsoclonus Myoclonus Syndrome/Dancing Eye syndrome (OMS/DES)

Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS), also known as dancing eye syndrome (DES), is a rare neurological condition which develops over days or weeks in early childhood. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Opsoclonus Myoclonus Syndrome/ Dancing Eye syndrome (OMS/DES) – also known as Kinsbourne syndrome.

Gallstones

Gallstones are stone-like formations found in the gallbladder. They can vary significantly in size, shape and consistency, and they can be present without causing any problems at all. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about gallstones, what causes them and how they can be treated using an operation to remove the gall bladder (laparoscopic cholecystectomy).

Fibrous dysplasia

Fibrous dysplasia is a congenital (present at birth) condition that affects bone growth and development. Instead of maturing into solid bone, affected bones stay at the immature fibrous stage so are weak and misshapen. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of fibrous dysplasia.

Brugada syndrome

Brugada syndrome is an inherited condition caused by a change in a person’s DNA. People with Brugada syndrome have changes in the microscopic structure of individual heart muscle cells – these changes affect the way that electrical impulses are able to pass through the heart. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the medical condition Brugada syndrome, what causes it and where to get help.

Hepatitis B

‘Hepatitis’ means inflammation of the liver – this inflammation can occur for many reasons, one of which is viral infection. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of hepatitis B in children and where to get help.

Obstructive sleep apnoea

Obstructive sleep apnoea is a condition that affects the airway and how we breathe. It is called OSA because Obstructive = there is obstruction of the airway in the nose, throat or upper airway, sleep = it happens when your child is asleep and apnoea = this is a Greek word that means ‘suspension of breathing’ – there is not enough air entering the lungs. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA).

Genetic aspects of primary immunodeficiency

This booklet has been produced jointly between PID UK, Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) and the Great North Children’s Hospital. It is designed to help answer the questions that families may have about the genetic aspects of primary immunodeficiencies (PID). The information has been reviewed by the PID UK Medical Advisory Panel and Patient Representative Panel and by families affected by PID but should not replace advice from a clinical immunologist or a geneticist.

Antley-Bixler syndrome

Antley-Bixler syndrome is a type of complex craniosynostosis named after the doctors who first described it. As well as the skull, the arms may also be affected. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Antley-Bixler syndrome.