Conditions we treat

Want to know more about the conditions we treat at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH)? Just search below:

Saethre-Chotzen syndrome

Saethre-Chotzen syndrome is a type of complex craniosynostosis named after the two doctors who described it in the mid-20th century. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome.
 

Muenke syndrome

Muenke syndrome (also known as FGFR3 associated craniosynostosis or P250arg mutation) is a type of complex craniosynostosis named after the doctor who first described it in the mid-1990s. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Muenke syndrome. 

Lambdoid craniosynostosis

Lambdoid craniosynostosis is a very rare type of non-syndromic craniosynostosis and occurs when one of the lambdoid sutures at the back of the head fuses before birth. It may be associated with other forms of syndromic craniosynostosis where more than one suture is fused. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of lambdoid craniosynostosis.
 

Bicoronal craniosynostosis

Bicoronal craniosynostosis is a type of craniosynostosis which may be part of a syndrome (collection of symptoms often seen together) or non-syndromic. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of bicoronal craniosynostosis.

Recently-identified genetic forms of craniosynostosis

Craniosynostosis is a condition where the plates of bone that make up the skull fuse too early, leading to a misshapen head. There are many different forms of craniosynostosis and this page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of two genetic forms of craniosynostosis (sometime known as Craniosynostosis 3 (CRS3) and Craniosynostosis 4 (CRS4)) that have recently been identified.

Metopic craniosynostosis

Metopic craniosynostosis is a type of non-syndromic craniosynostosis that occurs when the metopic suture fuses before birth. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of metopic craniosynostosis (also known as trigonocephaly) and where to get help.

Midfacial cleft

A midfacial cleft is a congenital (present at birth) condition affecting the bones and soft tissues of the face and neck. The two halves of the skull fail to join during pregnancy, leaving a cleft or dip along the central portion of the face. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes symptoms and treatment of midfacial cleft.

Treacher-Collins syndrome

Treacher-Collins syndrome (also known as mandibulofacial dysostosis) is a congenital (present at birth) condition affecting the bones and tissues in the face. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Treacher-Collins syndrome.

Cranio-fronto-nasal dysplasia

Cranio-fronto-nasal dysplasia is a type of craniosynostosis. The name describes the parts of the skull and face affected. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of cranio-fronto-nasal dysplasia (also known as cranio-fronto-nasal dysostosis).