Conditions we treat

Want to know more about the conditions we treat at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH)? Just search below:

Autoimmune enteropathy

Autoimmune enteropathy is a rare condition affecting young babies causing severe long-lasting diarrhoea. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of autoimmune enteropathy.

Haemangiomatosis

A haemangioma is a collection of small blood vessels that form a red mark or a swelling. The term haemangiomatosis is used when there are multiple haemangiomas. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of haemangiomatosis and where to get help. 

Tufting enteropathy

Tufting enteropathy (also known as intestinal epithelial dysplasia) is a very rare congenital (present at birth) condition affecting the inner surface of the intestines. It causes severe life threatening diarrhoea in the first few days after birth. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of tufting enteropathy.

Microvillus atrophy

Microvillus atrophy is a life threatening condition causing severe diarrhoea in the first few days or weeks after birth. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of microvillus atrophy. 

Pfeiffer syndrome

Pfeiffer syndrome is a type of complex craniosynostosis. There are three different types of Pfeiffer syndrome: Types 1, 2 and 3 (which also known as cloverleaf skull). This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Pfeiffer syndrome. 

Apert syndrome

Apert syndrome is a type of complex craniosynostosis named after the doctor who first described it in the early 20th century. As well as the skull and face, the hands and feet are also affected. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Apert syndrome.

Unicoronal craniosynostosis

Unicoronal craniosynostosis is a type of non-syndromic craniosynostosis and occurs when one of the two coronal sutures fuses before birth. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of unicoronal craniosynostosis and where to get help.

Sagittal craniosynostosis

Sagittal craniosynostosis (also known as scaphocephaly) is the most common type of non-syndromic craniosynostosis and occurs when the sagittal suture fuses before birth. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of sagittal craniosynostosis.

Crouzon syndrome

Crouzon syndrome is the most common type of complex craniosynostosis. It is named after the doctor who first described it in the early 20th century. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Crouzon syndrome.