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Tracheal resection

Tracheal resection is an operation on the windpipe – the tube which connects the voicebox to the lungs. It involves a short section of the windpipe being removed and the cut ends of the windpipe are stitched back together.

Cytotoxic and cytostatic medication - safe handling and administration

The term cytotoxic drug is used to refer to all drugs with direct anti-tumour activity including anti-cancer drugs, monoclonal antibodies, partially targeted treatments and immunosuppressive drugs. 

NOTE: We review our guidelines regularly and this guideline is now past its review date. The content of the guideline below may not reflect the most recent evidence based practice. Please use with caution.

Your child is having an MRI scan under intravenous sedation

MRI is short for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). This means that rather than using x-rays, the scan uses a strong magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to take very detailed pictures of inside the body. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about having a magnetic resonance imaging scan under intravenous sedation, how to prepare for it and what care your child will need afterwards.

Ketogenic diet

The ketogenic diet (KD) is a therapeutic diet, which has been shown to improve seizure control in patients with drug resistant epilepsy, and is used in some patients with metabolic conditions for example, glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1) and pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency (PDH).

Potassium iodate 

Potassium iodate is a thyroid blocking medicine. It is given before a particular type of isotope scan at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) called a MIBG scan. The potassium iodate protects the thyroid against the isotope given during this scan.

Aspirin

Aspirin is a medicine commonly used to relieve pain, reduce swelling and reduce a
high temperature. It also makes the blood less sticky so it is less likely to form a clot. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital describes aspirin, how it is given and some of its possible side effects.

Research and publications from the Psychological Medicine Service and National Tourette Syndrome Clinic

We have an ongoing programme of research, and you or your child may be invited to take part in a research project whilst under the care of the team. This is always entirely voluntary, and whether you choose to participate or not, your clinical care will not be affected. Any information gathered may be used anonymously for research purposes to improve our understanding and lead to better treatments for other children and families in the future.