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Hepatitis B

‘Hepatitis’ means inflammation of the liver – this inflammation can occur for many reasons, one of which is viral infection. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of hepatitis B in children and where to get help.

Gamma Knife® stereotactic radiosurgery

Gamma Knife® stereotactic radiosurgery is not actually a type of surgery at all – instead of opening the skull to remove a tumour or lesion, it is treated through the skin and skull using gamma radiation beams.This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about Gamma Knife® (also known as stereotactic radiosurgery), when it can be used and what to expect when your child comes to GOSH for assessment and treatment.

Factor V deficiency

Factor V deficiency (also occasionally known as Owren’s disease or parahaemophilia) is a clotting disorder. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Factor V deficiency and where to get help. 

Factor VII deficiency

Factor VII deficiency (also known as Alexander’s disease) is a type of clotting disorder. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Factor VII deficiency and where to get help.

Craniofacial microsomia

Craniofacial microsomia is a condition where one or both sides of the face (facial) is underdeveloped (microsomia). This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of craniofacial microsomia (also known as hemifacial microsomia or Goldenhar syndrome) and where to get help.

Factor X deficiency

Factor X (previously known as the Stuart-Prower factor) deficiency is a type of clotting disorder. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Factor X deficiency and where to get help.

Venous malformations

Venous malformations arise from genetic changes that cause certain veins to have an abnormal shape, to be abnormally located, or to be abnormally numerous and bulky. This information sheet provides information about venous malformations and how they can be treated. It also explains what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for diagnosis and treatment.

Osteogenesis imperfecta 

Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is a genetic condition present from birth. Its primary feature is fractures usually caused by minimal impact. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), what causes it and how it can be managed. It also tells you about the highly specialised service for OI based at GOSH.

Research at the National Centre for High Functioning Autism

The clinical team at GOSH works closely with the research department at the Behavioural and Brain Sciences Unit (BBSU) at UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health (ICH). We collaborate with colleagues around the world to try and understand the genetic, psychological and neurophysiological basis of disorders on the autism spectrum. All information we obtain in terms of interview, observation and other investigations is compiled into anonymised computerised files. From our database of nearly 2000 children, we are able to compare a child’s problems with others seen in our clinic and can look for similarities and differences. For research purposes, we usually ask parents to donate DNA samples too. 

Additional little fingers

This page explains about additional little fingers and how they can be corrected. The medical term for this is ‘ulnar polydactyly’. Ulnar polydactyly or having an additional little finger on one or both hands is very common, especially in certain ethnic groups.This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about additional little fingers and how they can be corrected.

Idiopathic scoliosis and spinal surgery

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes and symptoms of idiopathic scoliosis (curvature of the spine from an unknown cause). Surgery to correct the curvature is the main form of treatment offered at GOSH, so this pack gives details of the assessment process to help decide if spinal surgery is right for your child. It also tells you what to expect when your child comes to GOSH.

Birthmarks

A birthmark is a mark on the skin that is either present at birth or develops in the first few weeks of life. Birthmarks are very common and most types do not require any treatment at all. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes the different types of birthmark that can occur, how they can be treated (if needed) and where to get help. 

Gallstones

Gallstones are stone-like formations found in the gallbladder. They can vary significantly in size, shape and consistency, and they can be present without causing any problems at all. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about gallstones, what causes them and how they can be treated using an operation to remove the gall bladder (laparoscopic cholecystectomy).

Meningitis

Meningitis is an infection that affects the meninges – the tissue covering the brain and spinal cord. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of meningitis and where to get help.

Blue rubber bleb naevus syndrome

Blue rubber bleb naevus syndrome is the name given to a condition characterised by blue marks on the skin and internal organs caused by abnormal veins. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) provides information about the causes, symptoms and treatment of blue rubber bleb naevus syndrome and where to get help.

Keeping history alive: relocating the Italian Hospital's altar

Building is underway to transform the Grade II listed Italian Hospital building into the new Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) Sight and Sound Centre, supported by Premier Inn. But what happens to a beautiful 100-year-old altar secluded within the old building’s chapel? We talk to Crispin Walking-Lea, Head of Healthcare Planning at GOSH.

Lomustine

Lomustine is a chemotherapy medicine used to treat certain types of cancer. It is also sometimes known as CCNU. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what lomustine is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects.