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Gallstones

Gallstones are stone-like formations found in the gallbladder. They can vary significantly in size, shape and consistency, and they can be present without causing any problems at all. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about gallstones, what causes them and how they can be treated using an operation to remove the gall bladder (laparoscopic cholecystectomy).

Meningitis

Meningitis is an infection that affects the meninges – the tissue covering the brain and spinal cord. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of meningitis and where to get help.

Blue rubber bleb naevus syndrome

Blue rubber bleb naevus syndrome is the name given to a condition characterised by blue marks on the skin and internal organs caused by abnormal veins. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) provides information about the causes, symptoms and treatment of blue rubber bleb naevus syndrome and where to get help.

Treacher-Collins syndrome

Treacher-Collins syndrome is a congenital (present at birth) condition affecting the bones and tissues in the face. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Treacher-Collins syndrome (also known as mandibulofacial dysostosis) and where to get help.

Bowel incontinence

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains why bowel incontinence (encopresis or soiling) can occur in toilet-trained children and young people. It also gives suggestions for treatment and strategies to try at home to improve the situation.

Factor XI deficiency

Factor XI deficiency (also known as Haemophilia C, plasma thromboplastin antecedent deficiency or Rosenthal syndrome) is a clotting disorder. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Factor XI deficiency and where to get help.

Cranio-fronto-nasal dysplasia

Cranio-fronto-nasal dysplasia is a type of craniosynostosis. The name describes the parts of the skull and face affected. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of cranio-fronto-nasal dysplasia (also known as cranio-fronto-nasal dysostosis) and where to get help.

Carpenter syndrome

This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Carpenter syndrome (also known as acrocephalopolysyndactyly type 2 or ACPS II) and where to get help. Carpenter syndrome is a type of craniosynostosis named after the doctor who first described the condition.

Cytotoxic and cytostatic medication - safe handling and administration

The term cytotoxic drug is used to refer to all drugs with direct anti-tumour activity including anti-cancer drugs, monoclonal antibodies, partially targeted treatments and immunosuppressive drugs. 

NOTE: We review our guidelines regularly and this guideline is now past its review date. The content of the guideline below may not reflect the most recent evidence based practice. Please use with caution.

Generalised lymphatic anomaly (GLA)

Generalised lymphatic anomaly (GLA) – previously known as lymphangiomatosis – is the name given to a rare, congenital (present at birth), and progressive disorder of lymphatic channels which can affect different organs including the bones and the intestines. It can cause problems if the abnormal lymphatic tissue develops within important tissues and structures. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of generalised lymphatic anomalies (GLA) and where to get help. 

Apert syndrome

Apert syndrome is a type of complex craniosynostosis named after the doctor who first described it in the early 20th century. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Apert syndrome and where to get help.

Assessment for craniofacial surgery

You may already have seen members of the craniofacial team but often we ask for a more detailed assessment to plan treatment now and in the future. This craniofacial assessment takes place over two to three days and involves other members of the multidisciplinary craniofacial team. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the series of appointments that make up the craniofacial assessment process. 

Oesophageal atresia with tracheo-oesophageal fistula

Oesophageal atresia (OA) is a rare condition where a short section at the top of the oesophagus (gullet or foodpipe) has not formed properly so is not connected to the stomach. This means food cannot pass from the throat to the stomach. Tracheo-oesophageal fistula (TOF) is another rare condition, which tends to occur alongside oesophageal atresia. This is where part of the oesophagus is joined to the trachea (windpipe). This page explains about oesophageal atresia and tracheooesophageal fistula, how they are treated and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for treatment.