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Head injuries

Head injuries may involve the scalp, the skull, the brain or its protective membranes.This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the effects that a head injury can have on a child. It also sets out the treatment and care of any complications following a head injury.

Orthopaedic Physiotherapy

Orthopaedics is the specialty that treats diseases or injuries of the body's musculoskeletal system. This system includes your bones, joints, ligaments, tendons, muscles, and nerves and allows you to move, walk and be active. At Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) we specialise in treating babies, children and teenagers with often rare and complex congenital (born with) and developmental orthopaedic conditions.

Meet GOSH’s Great British Menu star judge, Barbara

Barbara Childs, Matron of the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), was invited to be a judge on this year’s series of Great British Menu, which is celebrating the 70th anniversary of the NHS. We spoke to Barbara to find out more about her experience as a star judge and working in the NHS in this special anniversary year.

Parenteral nutrition at home

Parenteral nutrition is used at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) when the gut is unable to absorb enough nutrition to enable your child to grow and develop normally. A liquid solution that contains nutrients (vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, proteins and fats) needed for growth and development is given directly into a vein.

Lung transplant

This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) is for parents of children and young people undergoing assessment for possible lung or heart-lung transplantation. A transplant is a serious operation and is not without risk. A transplant can be the only effective treatment option for certain serious lung diseases; however, it is not a cure. In many situations transplantation can lead to an extension of life with improved quality.

Symbrachydactyly

Symbrachydactyly is a congenital (present at birth) hand anomaly, which affects a single upper limb. It is not inherited. It is characterised by short, stiff, webbed or missing fingers. The underlying muscles, tendons, ligaments and bones are all affected.