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Parry-Romburg syndrome

Parry-Romburg syndrome (also known as Progressive Hemifacial Atrophy) is a rare condition affecting the skin and soft tissues on one side of the face (hemifacial). This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Parry-Romburg syndrome and where to get help.

Autoimmune encephalitis

Autoimmune encephalitis is a group of rare neurological condition causing inflammation of the brain. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of autoimmune encephalitis and where to get help.

Von Willebrand disease

Von Willebrand disease is a type of clotting disorder – more common than the better known haemophilia. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. Von Willebrand disease is named after the doctor first described the condition in the early 20th Century. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Von Willebrand disease and where to get help. 

Factor XI deficiency

Factor XI deficiency (also known as Haemophilia C, plasma thromboplastin antecedent deficiency or Rosenthal syndrome) is a clotting disorder. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Factor XI deficiency and where to get help.

Platelet disorders

Platelets are the cells responsible for making blood clot so platelet disorders mean that injured blood vessels bleed more than usual and heal more slowly. This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of inherited platelet disorders. 

Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)

This booklet has been produced jointly between PID UK, Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) and the Great North Children’s Hospital. The information has been reviewed by the PID UK Medical Advisory Panel and Patient Representative Panel and by families affected by PID. It is designed to help answer the questions families may have about the immune condition called severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) but should not replace advice from a clinical immunologist.

Factor V deficiency

Factor V deficiency (also occasionally known as Owren’s disease or parahaemophilia) is a clotting disorder. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Factor V deficiency and where to get help. 

Factor XIII deficiency

Factor XIII deficiency is a type of clotting disorder. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Factor XIII deficiency and where to get help.

Gastro-oesophageal reflux

When a baby or child has gastro-oesophageal reflux, the food and drink travels down the foodpipe as normal. However, some of the mixture of food, drink and acid travels back up the foodpipe, instead of passing through to the large and small intestines. As the food and drink is mixed with acid from the stomach, it can irritate the lining of the foodpipe, making it sore. This is gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

Factor X deficiency

Factor X (previously known as the Stuart-Prower factor) deficiency is a type of clotting disorder. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Factor X deficiency and where to get help.

Factor VII deficiency

Factor VII deficiency (also known as Alexander’s disease) is a type of clotting disorder. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Factor VII deficiency and where to get help.

Haemophilia B

Haemophilia B (also known as Factor IX deficiency) is a type of clotting disorder, much rarer than Haemophilia A (Classic Haemophilia or Factor VIII deficiency). A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Haemophilia B and where to get help.