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Advances in the treatment of the severe immune disorder Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

Researchers at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) have made an important breakthrough in understanding how the immune system becomes disrupted in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), a genetic disorder where the patient’s immune cells begin attacking their own body.

GOSH awarded £37 million funding to carry out pioneering paediatric research

The NIHR Great Ormond Street Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) has been awarded £37 million in funding to drive forward translational research into rare diseases in children. The Centre is the only one of its kind in the UK dedicated to paediatric research.

Research successes highlighted at BRC showcase event

Over 150 people came along to the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) GOSH Biomedical Research Centre showcase last month to hear about our latest research highlights - from cutting edge CAR-T therapies for leukaemia, to Oculome genomic sequencing to diagnose rare childhood eye conditions.

Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)

This booklet has been produced jointly between PID UK, Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) and the Great North Children’s Hospital. The information has been reviewed by the PID UK Medical Advisory Panel and Patient Representative Panel and by families affected by PID. It is designed to help answer the questions families may have about the immune condition called severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) but should not replace advice from a clinical immunologist.

Immunoglobulin therapy

This booklet has been produced by the PID UK Medical Advisory Panel and Patient Representative Panel in conjunction with Great Ormond Street Hospital and the Great North Children’s Hospital. It provides information on immunoglobulin therapy (Ig therapy) to help answer the questions parents may have about this form of treatment for children and young people affected by primary immunodeficiency (PID).The information should not, however, replace advice from a clinical immunologist.

Cytotoxic and cytostatic medication - safe handling and administration

The term cytotoxic drug is used to refer to all drugs with direct anti-tumour activity including anti-cancer drugs, monoclonal antibodies, partially targeted treatments and immunosuppressive drugs. 

NOTE: We review our guidelines regularly and this guideline is now past its review date. The content of the guideline below may not reflect the most recent evidence based practice. Please use with caution.