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Parry-Romburg syndrome

Parry-Romburg syndrome (also known as Progressive Hemifacial Atrophy) is a rare condition affecting the skin and soft tissues on one side of the face (hemifacial). This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Parry-Romburg syndrome and where to get help.

Aspirin

Aspirin is a medicine commonly used to relieve pain, reduce swelling and reduce a
high temperature. It also makes the blood less sticky so it is less likely to form a clot. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital describes aspirin, how it is given and some of its possible side effects.

Cytotoxic and cytostatic medication - safe handling and administration

The term cytotoxic drug is used to refer to all drugs with direct anti-tumour activity including anti-cancer drugs, monoclonal antibodies, partially targeted treatments and immunosuppressive drugs. 

NOTE: We review our guidelines regularly and this guideline is now past its review date. The content of the guideline below may not reflect the most recent evidence based practice. Please use with caution.

Medication overuse headache

Medication overuse headache (MOH) develops and gets worse with frequent use of any medication treatment for headache or migraine. It is also known as ‘rebound headache’. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of medication overuse headache and where to get help.

Co-trimoxazole (Septrin®)

This is an antibiotic. It is used to prevent and treat a type of chest infection called Pneumocystis Jiroveci pneumonia. You may hear the doctors and nurses referring to this as ‘PCP’ as it was previously called Pneumocystis Carinii pneumonia. This page explains what co-trimoxazole is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. Each person reacts differently to medicines, so your child will not necessarily suffer from every side effect mentioned. If you have any questions or concerns, please speak to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

ADOS and 3di training

We offer training in the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) and the Developmental, Dimensional and Diagnostic Interview (3di) through the Behavioural and Brain Sciences Unit at the UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health. We can also offer regional training courses in the 3di.

Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)

This booklet has been produced jointly between PID UK, Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) and the Great North Children’s Hospital. The information has been reviewed by the PID UK Medical Advisory Panel and Patient Representative Panel and by families affected by PID. It is designed to help answer the questions families may have about the immune condition called severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) but should not replace advice from a clinical immunologist.

Genetic aspects of primary immunodeficiency

This booklet has been produced jointly between PID UK, Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) and the Great North Children’s Hospital. It is designed to help answer the questions that families may have about the genetic aspects of primary immunodeficiencies (PID). The information has been reviewed by the PID UK Medical Advisory Panel and Patient Representative Panel and by families affected by PID but should not replace advice from a clinical immunologist or a geneticist.

Factor XI deficiency

Factor XI deficiency (also known as Haemophilia C, plasma thromboplastin antecedent deficiency or Rosenthal syndrome) is a clotting disorder. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Factor XI deficiency and where to get help.

Platelet disorders

Platelets are the cells responsible for making blood clot so platelet disorders mean that injured blood vessels bleed more than usual and heal more slowly. This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of inherited platelet disorders. 

Factor XIII deficiency

Factor XIII deficiency is a type of clotting disorder. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Factor XIII deficiency and where to get help.

Temozolomide

Temozolomide is a chemotherapy drug used to treat certain types of cancer. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what temozolomide is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects.

Factor V deficiency

Factor V deficiency (also occasionally known as Owren’s disease or parahaemophilia) is a clotting disorder. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Factor V deficiency and where to get help. 

Factor X deficiency

Factor X (previously known as the Stuart-Prower factor) deficiency is a type of clotting disorder. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Factor X deficiency and where to get help.

Factor VII deficiency

Factor VII deficiency (also known as Alexander’s disease) is a type of clotting disorder. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Factor VII deficiency and where to get help.