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When a child dies

This guideline is intended to supplement the resources found in the 'When a Child Dies' (WACD) purple box located in every ward, which gives detailed information on the care of a child after death and, additionally, the ongoing care and attention that the child's family will require (Rationale 1).

UK-wide consortium to transform treatment for children and young people with arthritis and uveitis

Researchers from the UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health (ICH) and Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) will lead a UK-wide effort to drive the development of new, targeted treatments for children and young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and its associated eye-inflammation condition, uveitis.

Halo traction

A halo-vest is used to immobilize and protect the cervical spine and neck after surgery or accident. The halo is a ring that surrounds the head and is attached by pins to the outer portion of the skull. It is used to stabilise the cervical spine, or to correct its alignment (Rationale 1, Rationale 2).

Halo vest traction is used infrequently for child and young people (CYP). It is usually a planned event, and in children is fitted under a general anaesthetic.

Lung transplant

This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) is for parents of children and young people undergoing assessment for possible lung or heart-lung transplantation. A transplant is a serious operation and is not without risk. A transplant can be the only effective treatment option for certain serious lung diseases; however, it is not a cure. In many situations transplantation can lead to an extension of life with improved quality.