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MEG scans

The brain works by a series of nerve impulses, which cause electrical signals within the brain. These signals (also called brainwaves) can be recorded through the scalp using an electroencephalogram (EEG). The electrical signals also produce weak magnetic fields, which can be measured through the skull and scalp using a magnetoencephalogram (MEG) scan.

Wellcome Trust funding success for research into stem cells, gut disorders and the genetics of childhood conditions

Prestigious Collaborative Award and Seed Award funding from the Wellcome Trust has been awarded to researchers at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) and the UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health (ICH). The awards will support pioneering laboratory-based research which will help shed light on the underlying genetic and molecular causes of rare childhood conditions.

Gene therapy treatment manufactured at GOSH and ICH used to treat world's first patient with life limiting genetic condition, MPSIIIA

A two-year old patient at the Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital (RMCH) is the first in the world to receive a pioneering new gene therapy treatment for the rare and life-limiting genetic condition, Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA (MPSIIIA). The treatment was manufactured at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) and the UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health (ICH) after being developed by RMCH and the University of Manchester.

Your child is having an MRI scan under intravenous sedation

MRI is short for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). This means that rather than using x-rays, the scan uses a strong magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to take very detailed pictures of inside the body. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about having a magnetic resonance imaging scan under intravenous sedation, how to prepare for it and what care your child will need afterwards.

Your child is having an MRI scan under intravenous sedation

MRI is short for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. This means that rather than using x-rays, the scan uses a strong magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to take very detailed pictures of inside the body. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about having a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan under intravenous sedation, how to prepare for it and what care your child will need afterwards.

Bronchoscopy, bronchogram and optical coherence tomography studies

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about bronchoscopy and bronchogram (B&B) studies and also the optical coherence tomography (OCT) study, which can be carried out during the same procedure. It explains why these may be suggested and what to expect. This combination of tests is carried out in the Interventional Radiology department. 

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